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Cable 243 - Cable

The cable also informed Lodge of the need to exonerate the ARVN from responsibility of the pagoda raids. It asked Lodge to approve a broadcast by the Voice of America placing the responsibility on Nhu. Lodge was further requested to examine and search for alternative leadership to replace Diem.

Cable 243 - Cable

The cable went on to instruct Lodge to inform Diem that the US could not accept the raids and to call for strong action to address the Buddhist crisis. Lodge was told to tell the South Vietnamese military officers that:

Cable 243 - Cable

The opening paragraphs of the cable stated:

Optical attached cable - Cable

The strain margin requirements tend to favour cable designs using multiple loose tubes. Tight-buffer cable designs do not provide sufficient strain margin and the optical fibre transmission performance is compromised under strong winds, heavy ice accretions and at high temperatures. In cables based on a single loose tube design, the optical fibres have too much freedom of movement along the cable axis. Consequently, mechanical energy in the form of wind-induced vibration of the host conductor causes the optical fibres to move gradually ‘downhill’ and allowing the excess fibre length to collect in the low point of the span. This uneven distribution of excess fibre length compromises the optical performance of the cable with increased optical attenuation at low temperatures in the relatively crowded sections of tube in the middle of spans and at high temperatures where the fibres are under strain at the high sections close to the towers. These problems are worse on longer spans.

Optical attached cable - Cable

Heat resistance is an important part of wrapped cable design. Conductors on overhead lines are subject to two different sources of severe temperature excursions: lightning strike and fault current. Lightning strikes produce a large and sudden increase in conductor temperature (from ambient temperature to over 200 °C in less than 40μs) followed by an exponential decay over tens of seconds back to ambient temperature. The amount of energy converted to heat in a lightning strike can be sufficient to melt several strands in a multi-stranded conductor. Fault currents tend to produce longer rise times (ms rather than μs) to somewhat lower temperatures (typically below 200 °C) and with a longer decay time. In order to cope with these temperatures, the sheath of a wrapped fibre optic cable must be made from a high-temperature material or it must be crosslinked to prevent melting. Suppliers will carry testing of their cable to demonstrate that it can survive a number of lightning strikes or fault current episodes.

Smallworld Cable - Cable TV

Smallworld provided a digital TV service over its cable TV network and provides over 120 channels including all local terrestrial services and subscription services, such as Sky Sports and Sky Movies. Multiroom services were available for an additional fee on top of the main TV subscription.

Cable knitting - Cable lattices

In some cases, one can form a lattice of cables, a kind of ribbing made of cables where the individual cable strands can be exchanged freely. A typical example is a set of parallel two-cable plaits in which, every so often, the two cables of each plait separate, going left and right and integrating themselves in the neighboring cables. In the process, the right-going cable of one plait crosses the left-going cable of its neighbor, forming an "X".

Cable One - Cable TV

Sparklight's Cable TV plans include Economy Cable TV, Standard Cable TV, and Elite 100 Plus. Cable TV can be accessed on Apple iPhone, Android, Windows, Roku, Xbox One, Xbox 360, and a Nook. Sparklight has a Digital Value Pack and offers Red Zone, HBO, and Showtime as add-ons.

Cable-ready - Digital cable

Digital cable-ready or DCR is a label used by manufacturers on new televisions which feature built-in technology that allows consumers to receive SDTV and HDTV digital cable programs. Usually this is a QAM tuner, since over-the-air broadcasts are either COFDM (DVB-T and ISDB-T) or 8VSB (ATSC-T). Some cable TV systems in North America use 16VSB instead of 256QAM, for which there are no cable-ready devices. Only channels that are left unencrypted can be received using this method, however encrypted channels can be viewed without a set-top-box using systems such as a CableCard or using a Downloadable Conditional Access System.

Plenum cable - Riser cable

Cable that is run between floors in non-plenum areas is rated as riser cable. The fire requirements on riser cable are not as strict. Thus, plenum cable can always replace riser cable, but riser cable cannot replace plenum cable in plenum spaces.

Plenum cable - Cable stiffness

Plenum-rated and riser-rated cables are restricted to only allow certain chemicals for manufacture of the wire insulation and cable sheath. Typically this results in reduced flexibility of plastic cables, making it stiff and hard to bend. The bend radius may also be increased, and tight bends can potentially crack or tear the insulation and sheathing.

Cable railings - Cable flexibility

All of the above factors work together to minimize the deflection of the cable to prevent a 4” sphere from passing between the cables when they are properly tensioned in a well-designed frame. This is a requirement according to a number of building codes. Among the more stringent, including that of California, this requirement may be used in conjunction with a weight being hung from the cable.

Cable-ready - Digital cable

Interactive digital cable ready or iDCR extends DCR. Unlike the DCR standard, iDCR supports interactive customer features such as electronic program guides, pay-per-view and video on demand. Consumer devices which support iDCR also support the new OpenCable Application Platform (OCAP) standard developed by CableLabs.

Cable management - Cable planning

Techs may employ different methods of cable planning, depending upon the level of detail required for proper management. Excel can be employed for organizing information, however techs often need a way to visually organize information, which goes beyond Excel’s capabilities. For proper visualization of cabling, companies may opt to use a cable management software package.

Cable railings - Cable flexibility

Cable flexibility is an important consideration in designing a cable railing. The old UBC (Uniform Building Code) and newer ICC (IBC and IRC) codes state that a 4” sphere shall not pass through any portion of a barrier on a guardrail. In a horizontal or vertical cable rail, the cables, once tensioned must be rigid enough to prevent a 4-inch sphere passing through it. Factors influencing this rigidity are: the tension of the cable, intermediate posts (or cable spacers) spacing, the diameter of the cable, top rail cap material and the cable to cable spacing. The application of the 4" sphere test is usually at the discretion of a code enforcement official who will interpret the force behind the 4" sphere so it is advised that cable spacing not be more than 3" over a 48" space between post.

Cable management - Cable labeling

Color-coding of cables is sometimes used to keep track of which is which. For instance, the wires coming out of ATX power supplies are color-coded by voltage. Documenting and labeling cable runs, tying related cables together by cable ties, cable lacing, rubber bands or other means, running them through cable guides, and clipping or stapling them to walls are other common methods of keeping them organized. Above drop ceilings, hooks or trays are used to organize cables and protect them from electrical interference

Newton Cable - Cable 10

Newton, like most local cable TV providers, encouraged the community in which they were based in to join in. Community members could suggest new show ideas or get involved in shows currently on the air. Newton also offered free technical courses to all members of the community, allowing everyone from students to business executives a chance to learn how to operate television production equipment. After many hours of hands on training, these people were able to operate camera, audio and editing equipment, as well as being able to set up lighting for sets. This was a great opportunity for people to learn these skills, but many volunteers also went on to work in the film and television industry both behind the scenes and in front of the camera.

Cable railings - Cable flexibility

Cable tension: An incredible amount of tension is generated on the end posts when ten or more cables, each tensioned at 200-400 lbs. over a height of 36" to 42” exists. Underestimating the tension of cables applied to end poles can cause a safety hazard. Cable can have too much deflection allowing body parts to slip through, or cables can merely "pull out" of the end fittings, causing the cable rail to fail. Poorly designed end posts will result in a railing where the cables cannot be properly tensioned without an unacceptable amount of cable deflection. End posts to which the tensioning hardware attaches must be constructed so that they will not deflect perceptibly.

Cable railings - Cable flexibility

Top rail: Top rail material must be strong as it is being compressed by the combined cable forces. Common top cap materials are the stronger species of wood or metal. Composite lumber can be used if a support rail is used along with it. The support rail is used between the posts to lend strength to the system, both between the posts, and to the Top Rail.

Plenum cable - Riser cable

Both plenum and riser cables commonly include a rope or polymer filament with high tensile strength, which helps support the weight of the cable when it is dangling in an open chute.

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