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Cash and cash equivalents - Restricted cash

Restricted cash is the amount of cash and cash equivalent items which are restricted for withdrawal and usage. The restrictions might include legally restricted deposits, which are held as compensating balances against short-term borrowings, contacts entered into with others or entity statements of intention with regard to specific deposits; nevertheless, time deposits and short-term certificates of deposit are excluded from legally restricted deposits. Restricted cash can be also set aside for other purposes such as expansion of the entity, dividend funds or "retirement of long-term debt". Depending on its immateriality or materiality, restricted cash may be recorded as "cash" in the financial statement or it might be classified based on the date of availability disbursements. Moreover, if cash is expected to be used within one year after the balance sheet date it can be classified as "current asset", but in a longer period of time it is mentioned as non- current asset. For example, a large machine manufacturing company receives an advance payment (deposit) from its customer for a machine that should be produced and shipped to another country within 2 months. Based on the customer contract the manufacturer should put the deposit into separate bank account and not withdraw or use the money until the equipment is shipped and delivered. This is a restricted cash, since manufacturer has the deposit, but he can not use it for operations until the equipment is shipped.

Zain Cash - Cash disbursement

ZainCash provides businesses with a cash disbursement application to disburse funds to a large number of staff across Iraq, including urban and rural areas.

Cash carrier - Cash balls

The earliest type was a two-piece hollow wooden ball which ran along sloping rails, carrying cash and sales docket or receipt. One set of rails sloped down from sales desk to cash office and another set sloped in the opposite direction. This was known as a cash railway. William Stickney Lamson of Lowell, Massachusetts patented this system in 1881. His invention soon attracted the interest of other shopkeepers and in 1882 the Lamson Cash Carrier Company was incorporated in Boston. A working example can be seen in the Co-operative store at Beamish Museum in North East England and one is still in its original location in the Up-To-Date Store, now a museum, at Coolamon, New South Wales.

Cash (currency) - Vietnamese cash

Cash (văn) was a currency unit for copper coinage in Vietnam until the introduction of the French Indochina piastre in 1885 when it became a sub unit of the piastre usually known as a sapèque.

Cash register - Cash drawer

A cash drawer is usually a compartment underneath a cash register in which the cash from transactions is kept. The drawer typically contains a removable till. The till is usually a plastic or wooden tray divided into compartments used to store each denomination of bank notes and coins separately in order to make counting easier. The removable till allows money to be removed from the sales floor to a more secure location for counting and creating bank deposits. Some modern cash drawers are individual units separate from the rest of the cash register.

Cash (currency) - Chinese cash

In China, cash - not to be confused with the type of copper coin - refers to a unit used for centuries for copper coinage and banknote equivalents known as wén (文). Being the first country to implement paper based currency, in 1023 the 交子 paper money currency occur to adapt the economical climate change of globalization brought by fair trade via silk road, although metal coins were still in circulation. After the introduction of a unified currency system in 1889, cash continued to be used as a subunit of the yuan with 1000 cash being equal to one yuan. Coins continued to be denominated in cash until the 1920s nationally and for a time thereafter regionally.

Cash (currency) - Madras cash

Cash was a currency unit of Madras Province during the period of British rule in India. Specifically, it was a subunit of the fanam, rupee, and pagoda.

Cash register - Cash drawer

A cash register's drawer can only be opened by an instruction from the cash register except when using special keys, generally held by the owner and some employees (e.g. manager). This reduces the amount of contact most employees have with cash and other valuables. It also reduces risks of an employee taking money from the drawer without a record and the owner's consent, such as when a customer does not expressly ask for a receipt but still has to be given change (cash is more easily checked against recorded sales than inventory).

Cash register - Cash drawer

A cash drawer is usually of strong construction and may be integral with the register or a separate piece that the register sits atop. It slides in and out of its lockable box and is secured by a spring-loaded catch. When a transaction that involves cash is completed, the register sends an electrical impulse to a solenoid to release the catch and open the drawer. Cash drawers that are integral to a stand-alone register often have a manual release catch underneath to open the drawer in the event of a power failure. More advanced cash drawers have eliminated the manual release in favor of a cylinder lock, requiring a key to manually open the drawer. The cylinder lock usually has several positions: locked, unlocked, online (will open if an impulse is given), and release. The release position is an intermittent position with a spring to push the cylinder back to the unlocked position. In the "locked" position, the drawer will remain latched even when an electric impulse is sent to the solenoid.

Cash register - Cash drawer

Cash registers include a key labeled "No Sale", abbreviated "NS" on many modern electronic cash registers. Its function is to open the drawer, printing a receipt stating "No Sale" and recording in the register log that the register was opened. Some cash registers require a numeric password or physical key to be used when attempting to open the till.

Cash and cash equivalents - Calculation of cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are listed on balance sheet as "current assets" and its value changes when different transactions are occurred.These changes are called "cash flows" and they are recorded on accounting ledger. For instance, if a company spends $300 on purchasing goods, this is recorded as $300 increase to its supplies and decrease in the value of CCE. These are few formulas that are used by analysts to calculate transactions related to cash and cash equivalents:

Cash (currency) - Travancore cash

Travancore cash was similar to the Madras cash yet differed in the value compared to the rupee.

Cash (currency) - Madras cash

Copper coins of 20 cash were called pice, 10 cash were called dodees, and 5 cash were called half dodees.

Cash register - Cash drawer

Due to the increasing number of notes and varieties of notes, many cash drawers are designed to store notes upright & facing forward, instead of the traditional flat & facing upright position. This enables faster access to each note and allows more varieties of notes to be stored. Sometimes the cashier will even divide the notes without any physical divider at all. Some cash drawers are flip top in design, where they flip open instead of sliding out like an ordinary drawer, resembling a cashbox instead.

Cash and cash equivalents - Calculation of cash and cash equivalents

Value of Cash and Cash Equivalents at the end of period = Net Cash Flow + Value of CCE at the period of beginning

Cash and cash equivalents - Calculation of cash and cash equivalents

'Change in CCE = End of Year Cash and Cash equivalents - Beginning of Year Cash and Cash Equivalents''. '''

Cash Explosion - Cash Explosion XL

The Cash Challenge is the same as in the regular version, but only one person from the winning team can play; the contestant is chosen via the new "Cash Challenge Qualifier."

Cash accumulation equation - Cash infeed

This is the neatest form of the cash accumulation equation, as we are calling it, but it not the most useful form. Using the exponential instead of the logarithmic function, the equation can be written out like this :

Cash-in-transit - Cash processing

There are on the other hand inherent difficulties associated with outsourcing. One of them is the loss of control and the reliance on external providers. In some cases, banks no longer have the know-how in relation to cash handling.

Cash-in-transit - Cash processing

Cash processing has evolved from a labor-intensive activity focused on the transportation of cash to a capital-intensive industry offering end-to end solutions. Transport no longer constitutes the value added in the business but continues to structure the organization. The CIT’s footprint remains a key factor of selection by banks and retailers.

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