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Maestro concept - Concept

The Maestro concept has five points:

Maestro concept - Concept

The Maestro concept is a time-management technique for story planning and newsroom organization through team collaboration to shape stories early before they are written. The central concept is trying to anticipate readers’ questions about news stories (“think like a reader”) and then answering those questions as quickly as possible through visual aspects with high-visibility points such as photos, headlines, captions and information graphics. It is a management technique to encourage collaboration across news departments and ensure that quality work in a story package comes not from the traditional method of an assembly line, but from teamwork and good time-management from all players working on the story.

Concept Processing - Concept Processing

Based on artificial intelligence technology and Boolean logic, Concept Processing attempts to mirror the mind of each physician by recalling elements from past cases that are the same or similar to the case being seen at that moment.

Neil's Heavy Concept Album - Concept

The title is self-referentially ironic, since progressive rock concept albums are supposed to have "heavy concepts" but "Neil's Heavy Concept Album" does not. Also, the front of the album sleeve is a loose parody of The Rolling Stones' Their Satanic Majesties Request album sleeve. The rear parodies the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, with Neil wearing different outfits replacing the images of the four Beatles, and the text "A heavy time is guaranteed for all." replacing "A splendid time is guaranteed for all."

Fuzzy concept - Fuzzy concept lattice

This is the basic idea of a "fuzzy concept lattice", which can also be graphed; different fuzzy concept lattices can be connected to each other as well (for example, in "fuzzy conceptual clustering" techniques used to group data, originally invented by Enrique H. Ruspini). Fuzzy concept lattices are a useful programming tool for the exploratory analysis of big data, for example in cases where sets of linked behavioural responses are broadly similar, but can nevertheless vary in important ways, within certain limits. It can help to find out what the structure and dimensions are, of a behaviour that occurs with an important but limited amount of variation in a large population.

Concept musical - First concept musical

There are two major contenders for the title of first concept musical, although the term itself had yet to be invented: Allegro (1947) by Rodgers and Hammerstein, and Love Life (1948) by Weill and Lerner.

Concept musical - First concept musical

Allegro, which concerns a son following in his father's footsteps, represents a "musical experiment" conducted by Rodgers and Hammerstein. Defying "virtually all musical theatre conventions" of the time, its Greek chorus frequently interrupts the narrative, and the show focuses on a larger theme of personal struggle in the face of success. Minimalist in its staging, patterns of light were used to represent both spaces and emotions. However, many critics disagree as to Allegro's status as a concept musical, stating that the linear nature of the plot continues regardless of the choral interludes. The show was a critical failure, which many theatre historians blame on the inexperience of director-choreographer Agnes de Mille. Disheartened, Rodgers and Hammerstein returned to a more traditional format. Whether or not it was indeed a concept musical or merely a predecessor of things to come, Allegro "opened the door to a splendid new way of writing for musical theatre." Allegro also provides a connection between the concept musical and Stephen Sondheim, who was mentored by Hammerstein and worked as a production assistant on Allegro.

Rimac Concept One - Concept S

The Concept S is a lighter, more powerful, more aerodynamic and track-oriented iteration of the Concept One. The electric motors in the Concept S can generate, enabling the car to accelerate from 0 – in just 2.5 seconds and attain a top speed of 365 km/h. By making modifications to produce the carbon fibre shell of the car, Rimac has reduced the weight of the Concept S by. The car also receives a full aerodynamic package which includes a large carbon fibre front splitter, side skirts, racing slicks and a large rear wing that generates 34% more downforce than the Concept One. On the interior, the car features racing bucket seats with 4-point racing harness, a new steering wheel, a driver focused infotainment system that projects only the most important information on the central display and Alcantara trim. Production was limited to two cars.

Piast Concept - Rival Jagiellon Concept

There was a rival Jagiellon Concept, one endorsed by the interwar governments dominated by Józef Piłsudski. Its advocates idealized the grandeur of the Poland under the Jagiellonian dynasty in the later Middle Ages, which linked Poland-Lithuania, Bohemia, and Hungary under Polish kings. The Jagiellon Concept looked more to the underdeveloped eastern territories inhabited mostly by Ukrainians, Lithuanians and Belarusians and as such was criticized by supporters of Piast concept for neglecting interests of Polish population in the West, focusing on underdeveloped agricultural territories instead of industrial regions and putting Poland unnecessarily at odds with the powerful Russian state while ignoring the threat from Germany, which was considered far more dangerous in its ability to eradicate Polish identity than Russia. Since Jagiellonian Poland ultimately led to Poland being extinguished from the international arena, it wasn't seen as an attractive model to follow by the followers of the Piast concept. Today modern Poland follows the ideas of the Piast concept, by following a western-orientated foreign policy.

Mini concept cars - Electric Concept

The Electric Concept was presented during IAA 2017 in Frankfurt. It's a preview of a fully electric production model.

Concept inventory - Concept inventories in use

Concept inventories are education-related diagnostic tests. In 1985 Halloun and Hestenes introduced a "multiple-choice mechanics diagnostic test" to examine students' concepts about motion. It evaluates student understanding of basic concepts in classical (macroscopic) mechanics. A little later, the Force Concept Inventory (FCI), another concept inventory, was developed. The FCI was designed to assess student understanding of the Newtonian concepts of force. Hestenes (1998) found that while "nearly 80% of the [students completing introductory college physics courses] could state Newton's Third Law at the beginning of the course. FCI data showed that less than 15% of them fully understood it at the end".These results have been replicated in a number of studies involving students at a range of institutions (see sources section below). That said, there remains questions as what exactly the FCI measures. Results from Hake (1998) using the FCI have led to greater recognition in the science education community of the importance of students' "interactive engagement" with the materials to be mastered. .

Concept inventory - Concept inventories in use

Since the development of the FCI, other physics instruments have been developed. These include the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation developed by Thornton and Sokoloff and the Brief Electricity and Magnetism Assessment developed by Ding et al. For a discussion of how a number of concept inventories were developed see Beichner. Information about physics concept tests can be found at the NC State Physics Education Research Group website (see the external links below).

Concept inventory - Concept inventories in use

In addition to physics, concept inventories have been developed in statistics, chemistry, astronomy, basic biology, natural selection, genetics, engineering, geoscience. and computer science.

Concept Processing - How Concept Processing works

Concept Processing also can be used for rare cases. These are usually combinations of SOAP note elements, which in themselves are not rare. If the text of each element is saved for a given type of case, there will be elements available to use with other cases, even though the other cases may not be similar overall.

Concept Processing - How Concept Processing works

If the encounter is similar but not identical, the physician modifies the differences from the closest case using hand-writing recognition, voice recognition, or keyboard. A Concept Processor then memorizes all the changes, so that when the next encounter falls between two similar cases, the editing is cut in half, and then by a quarter for the next case, and then by an eighth....and so on. In fact, the more a Concept Processor is used, the faster and smarter it becomes.

Species concept - Mayr's Biological Species Concept

After Mayr's book, some two dozen species concepts were introduced. Some, such as the Phylogenetic Species Concept (PSC), were designed to be more useful than the BSC for describing species. Many authors have professed to "solve" or "dissolve" the species problem. Some have argued that the species problem is too multidimensional to be "solved" by any one concept. Since the 1990s, others have argued that concepts intended to help describe species have not helped to resolve the species problem. Although Mayr promoted the BSC for use in systematics, some systematists have criticized it as not operational. For others, the BSC is the preferred definition of species. Many geneticists who work on speciation prefer the BSC because it emphasizes the role of reproductive isolation. It has been argued that the BSC is a natural consequence of the effect of sexual reproduction on the dynamics of natural selection.

Concept Processing - How Concept Processing works

A Concept Processor brings forward the closest previous encounter in relation to the one being seen at that moment, putting that case in front of the physician for fine-tuning.

Species concept - Mayr's Biological Species Concept

Ernst Mayr's 1942 book was a turning point for the species problem. In it, he wrote about how different investigators approach species identification, and he characterized their approaches as species concepts. He argued for what came to be called the Biological Species Concept (BSC), that a species consists of populations of organisms that can reproduce with one another and that are reproductively isolated from other populations, though he was not the first to define "species" on the basis of reproductive compatibility. For example, Mayr discusses how Buffon proposed this kind of definition of "species" in 1753. Theodosius Dobzhansky was a contemporary of Mayr and the author of a classic book about the evolutionary origins of reproductive barriers between species, published a few years before Mayr's. Many biologists credit Dobzhansky and Mayr jointly for emphasizing reproductive isolation.

Concept Processing - How Concept Processing works

If the closest encounter is identical to your present one, the physician has effectively completed charting. A Concept Processor will pull through all the related information needed.

Concept testing - Evaluating concept-test scores

Traditionally concept-test survey results are compared to 'norms databases'. These are databases of previous new-product concept tests. These must be 'monadic' concept tests, to prevent interaction effects. To be fair, it is important that these databases contain 'new' concept test results, not ratings of old products that consumers are already familiar with; since once consumers become familiar with a product the ratings often drop. Comparing new concept ratings to the ratings for an existing product already on the market would result in an invalid comparison, unless special precautions are taken by researchers to reduce or adjust for this effect quantitatively. Additionally, the concept is usually only compared to norms from the same product category, and the same country.

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