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HVDC converter station - Converter

The converter is usually installed in a building called the valve hall. Early HVDC systems used mercury-arc valves, but since the mid-1970s, solid state devices such as thyristors have been used. Converters using thyristors or mercury-arc valves are known as line commutated converters. In thyristor-based converters, many thyristors are connected in series to form a thyristor valve, and each converter normally consists of six or twelve thyristor valves. The thyristor valves are usually grouped in pairs or groups of four and can stand on insulators on the floor or hang from insulators from the ceiling.

Ćuk converter - Zeta Converter

A zeta converter provides an output voltage that is the opposite of the output voltage of a Ćuk converter.

HVDC converter station - Converter transformer

Converter transformers operate with high flux Power Steps In the Four Steps of the Converter per cycle, and so produce more acoustic noise than normal three-phase power transformers. This effect should be considered in the siting of an HVDC converter station. Noise-reducing enclosures may be applied.

Torque converter - Torque converter elements

Although not strictly a part of classic torque converter design, many automotive converters include a lock-up clutch to improve cruising power transmission efficiency and reduce heat. The application of the clutch locks the turbine to the impeller, causing all power transmission to be mechanical, thus eliminating losses associated with fluid drive.

Phase converter - Rotary Phase Converter

A rotary phase converter will just change the phase of power, not the voltage. This is not a problem as you can pair a rotary phase converter with a transformer. Having a transformer will allow you to either step your voltage up or down depending on what is needed. This is actually a great benefit as if you are in a shop setting, it gives you the option to run multiple machines at different voltages off of the same phase converter set up.

HVDC converter - Three-level converter

In an attempt to improve on the poor harmonic performance of the two-level converter, some HVDC systems have been built with three level converters. Three-level converters can synthesize three (instead of only two) discrete voltage levels at the AC terminal of each phase: +½ U d, 0 and -½ U d. A common type of three-level converter is the diode-clamped (or neutral-point-clamped) converter, where each phase contains four IGBT valves, each rated at half of the DC line to line voltage, along with two clamping diode valves. The DC capacitor is split into two series-connected branches, with the clamping diode valves connected between the capacitor midpoint and the one-quarter and three-quarter points on each phase. To obtain a positive output voltage (+½ U d ) the top two IGBT valves are turned on, to obtain a negative output voltage (-½ U d ) the bottom two IGBT valves are turned on and to obtain zero output voltage the middle two IGBT valves are turned on. In this latter state, the two clamping diode valves complete the current path through the phase.

Phase converter - Rotary Phase Converter

A Rotary Phase Converter is an economical way to create a three phase power solution in an area where three phase utility power is not available or cost prohibitive to bring in. A Rotary Phase Converter utilizes two components to create three phase power. A well built rotary phase converter will use a control panel that features both a start circuit and run circuit. Having the two circuits allows for the converter to create balanced and clean power without having an over voltage issue. Then the second component - the three phase motor. The motor is what will produce the third leg of power. With the third leg of power being produced, it will provide 100% power to your machine. In the best rotary style set ups, they are using a custom designed induction generator as the idler. These are manufactured specifically for phase conversion and will produce a true three phase sine wave. There are even rotary phase converter manufacturers that produce a digitally controlled rotary converter. These units will produce clean and balanced power that is clean enough to run on voltage sensitive loads such as a CNC machine, welder, or any other computer controlled load or voltage sensitive equipment.

Phase converter - Digital Phase Converter

The output inverter consists of IGBTs that draw on the power of the DC bus to create an AC voltage. A voltage created by power-switching devices like IGBTs is not sinusoidal. It is a pulse-width modulated (PWM) waveform very high in harmonic distortion. This PWM voltage is then passed through an inductor/capacitor filter system that produces a sine-wave voltage with less than 3% total harmonic distortion (standards for computer grade power allow up to 5% THD). By contrast, VFDs generate a PWM voltage that limits their versatility and makes them unsuitable for many applications. Software in the DSP continually monitors and adjusts this generated voltage to produce a balanced three-phase output at all times. It also provides protective functions by shutting down in case of utility over-voltage and under-voltage or a fault. With the ability to adjust to changing conditions and maintain voltage balance, a digital phase converter can safely and efficiently operate virtually any type of three-phase equipment or any number of multiple loads.

Phase converter - Digital Phase Converter

A digital phase converter creates a three-phase power supply from a single-phase supply. A digital signal processor (DSP) is used to control power electronic devices to generate a third voltage, which along with the single voltage from the supply creates a balanced three-phase power supply.

HVDC converter - Two-level converter

From the very first VSC-HVDC scheme installed (the Hellsjön experimental link commissioned in Sweden in 1997 ) until 2012, most of the VSC HVDC systems built were based on the two level converter. The two-level converter is the simplest type of three-phase voltage-source converter and can be thought of as a six pulse bridge in which the thyristors have been replaced by IGBTs with inverse-parallel diodes, and the DC smoothing reactors have been replaced by DC smoothing capacitors. Such converters derive their name from the fact that the voltage at the AC output of each phase is switched between two discrete voltage levels, corresponding to the electrical potentials of the positive and negative DC terminals. When the upper of the two valves in a phase is turned on, the AC output terminal is connected to the positive DC terminal, resulting in an output voltage of +½ U d with respect to the midpoint potential of the converter. Conversely when the lower valve in a phase is turned on, the AC output terminal is connected to the negative DC terminal, resulting in an output voltage of -½ U d. The two valves corresponding to one phase must never be turned on simultaneously, as this would result in an uncontrolled discharge of the DC capacitor, risking severe damage to the converter equipment.

Torque converter - Torque converter elements

A fluid coupling is a two element drive that is incapable of multiplying torque, while a torque converter has at least one extra element—the stator—which alters the drive's characteristics during periods of high slippage, producing an increase in output torque.

Ćuk converter - Isolated Ćuk converter

As the non-isolated Ćuk converter, the isolated Ćuk converter can have an output voltage magnitude that is either greater than or less than the input voltage magnitude, even with a 1:1 AC transformer.

Torque converter - Torque converter elements

In a torque converter there are at least three rotating elements: the impeller, which is mechanically driven by the prime mover; the turbine, which drives the load; and the stator, which is interposed between the impeller and turbine so that it can alter oil flow returning from the turbine to the impeller. The classic torque converter design dictates that the stator be prevented from rotating under any condition, hence the term stator. In practice, however, the stator is mounted on an overrunning clutch, which prevents the stator from counter-rotating with respect to the prime mover but allows forward rotation.

HVDC converter station - Converter transformer

The converter transformers step up the voltage of the AC supply network. Using a star-to-delta or "wye-delta" connection of the transformer windings, the converter can operate with 12 pulses for each cycle in the AC supply, which eliminates numerous harmonic current components. The insulation of the transformer windings must be specially designed to withstand a large DC potential to earth. Converter transformers can be built as large as 300 megavolt-amperes (MW) as a single unit. It is impractical to transport larger transformers, so when larger ratings are required, several individual transformers are connected together. Either two three-phase units or three single-phase units can be used. With the latter variant only one type of transformer is used, making the supply of a spare transformer more economical.

Sparse matrix converter - Matrix Converter

Matrix converter is a device which converts AC input supply to the required variable AC supply as output without any intermediate conversion process whereas in case of Inverter which converts AC - DC - AC which takes more extra components as diode rectifiers, filters, charge-up circuit but not needed those in case of matrix converters

Ćuk converter - Isolated Ćuk converter

Because the isolated Ćuk converter is isolated, the output-voltage polarity can be chosen freely.

Phase converter - Digital Phase Converter

The solid-state design results in a relatively small package with no moving parts except for small cooling fans. The converters operate at 95%–98% efficiency. When the converter is energized with no load, it consumes very little power.

Phase converter - Digital Phase Converter

In one type of digital phase converter the input rectifier consists of IGBTs in series with inductors. The IGBTs are controlled by software in the DSP to draw current from the single-phase line in a sinusoidal fashion, charging capacitors on a constant-voltage DC bus. Because the incoming current is sinusoidal, there are no significant harmonics generated back onto the line as there are with the rectifiers found in most VFDs. The controlled rectifier input allows power factor correction.

Ćuk converter - Isolated Ćuk converter

The Ćuk converter can be made in an isolated kind. An AC transformer and an additional capacitor must be added.

HVDC converter - Two-level converter

Another disadvantage of the two-level converter is that, in order to achieve the very high operating voltages required for an HVDC scheme, several hundred IGBTs have to be connected in series and switched simultaneously in each valve. This requires specialised types of IGBT with sophisticated gate drive circuits, and can lead to very high levels of electromagnetic interference.