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Kapamilya, Deal or No Deal - Ka-Text, Deal or No Deal

Along with the show's return, a new promo was launched, named after the first text promo Ka-text, Deal or No Deal, wherein home viewers can win half of either what the contestant has won or the contents of the chosen briefcase (i.e. ranging from 50¢ to PHP1,500,000). Viewers can text the contestant's possible final response of "Deal" or "No Deal." Texting stops after the contestant has made his/her final decision. The next day, a winner is chosen from those who texted; if the contestant's final decision is "No Deal," only those who text the same response would win. On the other hand, when the contestant says "Deal," all who texted will be considered, regardless of response; what the winner would receive depends on the response.

Kapamilya, Deal or No Deal - Ka-Text, Deal or No Deal

In the show's third season, the rules were modified. Viewer could text "Deal" if the accepted offer was larger than the contents of the chosen briefcase or "No Deal" if the briefcase contents is larger than the accepted offer or the Banker's final offer if the contestant decides to say "No Deal" all the way. The correct response would depend on the outcome of the game; only those who text the correct response are eligible for prizes: P20,000 for the daily winners or P200,000 for the monthly winner. The promo was relaunched later with the same daily prizes, but this time, a Nissan Navara was up for grabs as the grand prize.

Deal sourcing - Online deal sourcing

Traditional methods of deal origination are fast giving way to online deal sourcing platforms for buy-side and sell-side opportunities. Several financial technology companies around the world provide services to users to enable them to go beyond their network of contacts and source deals on the basis of a variety of criteria. In addition, online deal sourcing is considered vital in M&A transactions. There are various online deal sourcing platforms available such as Navatar, Dealsuite, Brookz, BankerBay, and Dealnexus.

Deal or No Deal (Irish game show) - Deal or No Deal Scratchcard

The Deal or No Deal Scratchcard is largely based on the TV game show. Entry to the main game show on TV3 is only possible by purchasing the Deal or No Deal Scratchcard from any National Lottery agent. If a player reveals the word "Deal" on the "Banker's Bonus" section of the scratchcard, they can send it to the National Lottery in the special Deal or No Deal envelopes, for a chance to appear on the show. The Deal or No Deal Scratchcard costs €3.

Deal or No Deal (British game show) - Celebrity Deal or No Deal

On 8 April 2012, Deal or No Deal started broadcasting celebrity editions of the show. These episodes saw famous faces including (in order of appearance) Jimmy Carr, Olly Murs (who appeared on the show previously), Sarah Millican, Louis Walsh, Peter Andre, Katie Price, McFly, Joan Collins, Jonathan Ross, JLS, Gok Wan and Alan Carr all playing for charity.

Deal (Greek game show) - Super Deal

A spin-off of the original Greek "Deal", this version aired on the same network (ANT1) on Saturday and Sunday nights until December 2007. 26 similarly dressed female models hold 26 cases with the top prize being €500,000 (€300,000 more than the grand prize of the original show). The contestant earns 100% of the prize. The show is supervised by lawyer Yannis Marakakis, a former model and former athlete. This version is almost identical to the US version of Deal or No Deal, hosted by Howie Mandel. The highest prize won was 260,000 euros. This was achieved by a 19 year old greek medical student in 2007.

Destroyers-for-bases deal - The deal

President Roosevelt approved the deal on the evening of August 30, 1940. On September 2, 1940, as the Battle of Britain intensified, Secretary of State Cordell Hull signaled agreement to the transfer of the warships to the Royal Navy. On September 3, 1940, Admiral Harold Stark certified that the destroyers were not vital to the security of the US. In exchange, the US was granted land in various British possessions for the establishment of naval or air bases with rent-free, 99-year leases, on:

Let's Make a Deal - Big Deal

When the Big Deal is not behind the selected door, one of the non-Big Deal doors is opened first, then the chosen door, with the Big Deal revealed last. If the Big Deal door IS selected, the other two doors are usually revealed first, although on rare occasions, the Big Deal door has been revealed second, after one of the other two doors (usually the "Medium" door) is revealed.

Let's Make a Deal - Big Deal

Each of the doors conceals either a prize package of some sort, or a cash award hidden inside a prop such as "Monty's Piggy Bank" or the "Let's Make a Deal Vault." On occasion, a door containing an all-cash prize is opened before the traders make their choices, but the amount of the prize is not revealed. Most often, the value of the "Low" Door (the lowest-valued door) is less than the value of the player's original winnings, while the "Medium" Door's value is at least $1,000 more than the player's traded winnings.

Let's Make a Deal - Super Deal

During the 1975–76 syndicated season, winners of the Big Deal were offered a chance to win the "Super Deal". At this point, Big Deals were limited to a range of $8,000 to $10,000. The trader could risk their Big Deal winnings on a shot at adding a $20,000 cash prize, which was hidden behind only one of three mini-doors onstage. The other two doors contained cash amounts of $1,000 or $2,000; however, the $1,000 value was later replaced with a "mystery" amount between $1,000 and $9,000. A trader who decided to play risked their Big Deal winnings and selected one of the mini-doors. If the $20,000 prize was behind the door, the trader kept the Big Deal and added the $20,000 prize, for a potential maximum total of $30,000. However, if a trader selected one of the other two doors, he or she forfeited the Big Deal prizes but kept the cash amount behind the door. The Super Deal was discontinued when the show permanently moved to Las Vegas for the final season (1976–77), and Big Deal values returned to the previous range of $10,000 to $15,000.

Let's Make a Deal - Big Deal

The Big Deal serves as the final segment of the show and offers a chance at a significantly larger prize for a lucky trader. Before the round, the value of the day's Big Deal is announced to the audience.

Let's Make a Deal - Big Deal

The Big Deal is the one time in the show where a trader is guaranteed to not walk away with a Zonk.

Let's Make a Deal - Big Deal

The process for choosing traders was the same for every series through the 2003 NBC primetime series. Monty Hall (or his successors) would begin asking the day's traders, starting with the highest winner, if they wanted to give back what they had managed to win earlier in the show for a chance to choose one of three numbered doors on the stage. The process continued until two traders agreed to play, and the biggest winner of the two got first choice of Door #1, Door #2, or Door #3. The other trader then chose from the remaining two doors. Since the 2009 series, the Big Deal has been played with just one trader.

Deal flow - Sources of deal flow

In order to create and maintain a sufficient deal flow, venture capitalists and angels spend much of their time doing business development, raising their profiles by giving speeches, writing blogs, and networking with others who also work with early-stage companies. VCs and angels also regularly attend conferences and "venture fairs" where multiple companies pitch their businesses to investors.

Let's Make a Deal - Super Deal

From 2012 to 2016 of the Brady version, the Super Deal was offered as a limited event (usually for a week of shows promoted as "Super Deal Week") and was not played regularly. The show designated one or two weeks of episodes, typically airing during a special event (e.g., the 500th episode, 50th anniversary of franchise, etc.). In this version, the top cash prize was $50,000 while the other two cash prizes were $1,000 and $2,000. In addition, instead of using mini-doors, the cash amounts were hidden in three large colored envelopes of red, green, and purple, respectively referred by Brady as ruby, emerald, and sapphire.

Let's Make a Deal - Big Deal

The Big Deal prize is usually the most extravagant on each episode, and is often a car or a vacation with first-class accommodations. On occasion, the Big Deal consists of one of the all-cash prizes mentioned above; at other times, a cash bonus is added to the prizes in the Big Deal to bring the total up to the announced value. On other occasions, the Big Deal is revealed to include "Everything in the Big Deal", meaning the prizes behind all 3 doors are won if the player chose the Big Deal.

Destroyers-for-bases deal - The deal

No destroyers were received in exchange for the bases in Bermuda and Newfoundland. Both territories were vital to trans-Atlantic shipping, aviation, and to the Battle of the Atlantic. Although enemy attack on either was unlikely, it could not be discounted, and Britain had been forced to wastefully maintain defensive forces, including the Bermuda Garrison. The deal allowed Britain to hand much of the defence of Bermuda to the still-neutral US, freeing British forces for redeployment to more active theatres. It also enabled the development of strategic facilities at US expense which British forces would also use.

Deal or No Deal (Australian game show) - Double Deal Friday

Double Deal Friday ran in 2005 but was dropped after 2008. Home viewers were invited to ring a phone number charged at $0.55 and register their details. Every Friday, a home viewer was randomly selected to win the same prize as the studio contestant. Host O'Keefe had mentioned that Double Deal Fridays received over 100,000 calls each week. Dancing with the Deals (the celebrity version of DoND retiring contestants on that season's edition of Dancing With The Stars) followed a similar format to Double Deal Friday, except that the celebrity didn't win the prize.

Deal flow - Sources of deal flow

A fund's or group's deal flow is generated from many sources. The most valuable referrals often come from entrepreneurs or companies in which the fund has previously invested; from other funds looking to syndicate a deal; and from professionals (such as attorneys and accountants) who are familiar with the fund's investment criteria. Other sources of deal flow are investment bankers and "finders", who expect to receive a fee (from either the company or the investor) for making the introduction.

Deal or No Deal (Australian game show) - Deal or No Deal: Double Shot

In the selected episodes of the 2008-2011 season (Seasons 6 to 9), Channel Seven decided to add another $200,000 to the board as part of the Double Shot. the host, Andrew O'Keefe, revealed that it was "Double Shot" day and asks Marjorie Q. Smythe (wife of the evil banker, Walter P) to replace the 50c amount with the second $200,000 amount. These set of episodes have said to answer to the premiere of Million Dollar Wheel of Fortune on the Nine Network, which will air at the same time as Deal or No Deal in 2008 and Millionaire Hot Seat in 2009. (also during "Dancing with the Deals" and "Footy Finals Fever"). Also, for the podium players, should they say that there is $200,000 in their briefcase, they must specify whether it is the normal $200,000 or The "Double Shot" $200,000 to prevent them in 1 of 13 chance at the correct guess of $500. A similar special aired in 2004, in celebration of the program's 200th episode, two $200,000 cases were instituted, however, the second $200,000 is in the replacement of $1,500 rather than the 50c.

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