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Squerryes Estate - Estate

One third of the estate is woodland. Almost all of the traditional farm buildings have been restored and converted into offices or workshops, which are let to local businesses. Some farm houses and cottages have been refurbished and let to tenants.

Squerryes Estate - Estate

All the farms on the estate have been amalgamated into a single agricultural unit. There is a 200-head dairy herd which produces milk for Marks & Spencer. The calves are reared on the farm; the Friesian heifers join the herd, while the bull calves and cross-bred heifers are grown for beef using the natural grazing in the park. The arable land produces millet, wheat, malting barley, and oilseed rape, together with oats, barley and beans for the cattle.

Biltmore Estate - Estate

Vanderbilt's idea was to replicate the working estates of Europe. He asked Hunt and Olmsted to design a village with architecturally compatible buildings and picturesque landscaping as a source of income through building rental, a place to help carry out philanthropic programs, and an easy point of access between the estate and the train station. The result was Biltmore Village. The village included rental cottages complete with plumbing and central heating, a post office, shops, doctor's office, school, and a church, known today as the Cathedral of All Souls. Intending that the estate could be self-supporting, Vanderbilt set up scientific forestry programs, poultry farms, cattle farms, hog farms, and a dairy. His wife, Edith, also enthusiastically supported agricultural reform and promoted the establishment of a state agricultural fair. In 1901, the Vanderbilts provided financial assistance to Biltmore Industries, started by Biltmore Village resident Eleanor Vance, which taught young people how to make hand-carved furniture, woven baskets, homespun wool fabric, and more.

Holnicote Estate - Estate

Holnicote Estate covers more than 12,000 acre and contains more than 240 km of footpaths and bridleways. It includes Dunkery and Selworthy Beacons, and the villages and hamlets of Selworthy, Allerford, Bossington, Horner and Luccombe as well as the Dunkery and Horner Woods National Nature Reserve. The estate also plays host to a point to point course on which many Exmoor hunts hold their meetings throughout the spring.

Yaralla Estate - Estate

The Estate is made up of a number of clusters of farm and service buildings and structures. The grounds in their heyday were extraordinary and a lot of time and money went into establishing large areas of lawn with a rich range of native and European trees, rockeries, walks, fountains, ornamental urns and statues, grottos, hot houses, a conservatory, rose gardens and more than a dozen cottages, scattered across the grounds.

Holnicote Estate - Estate

The estate had a role, together with the Acland family's other Exmoor estate of Pixton, as a home of West Country staghunting in the 18th century. There was some controversy locally and nationally when the National Trust banned staghunting on the estate in the early 21st century.

Holnicote Estate - Estate

Since 2009 the estate has been one of three Multi-Objective Flood Management Demonstration Schemes, funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, to examine how changes in the management of river catchment areas can influence the incidence and severity of flooding in the area.

Squerryes Estate - Estate

The Squerryes Estate consists of 2,500 acres and borders Surrey to the west and Greater London to the north.

Biltmore Estate - Estate

The estate today covers approximately 8,000 acres and is split in half by the French Broad River. The estate is overseen by The Biltmore Company, a trust set up by the family. The company is a large enterprise that is one of the largest employers in the Asheville area. Restaurants were opened in 1979 and 1987 as well as four gifts shops in 1993. The former dairy barn was converted into the Biltmore Winery in 1985. The 210-room Inn on Biltmore Estate opened in 2001, and in 2010, the estate opened Antler Hill Village, as well as a remodeled winery, and connected farmyard.

Yaralla Estate - Estate

Various conservation works to elements of the estate and garden have brought the garden and grounds to a high level of condition, considering the more constrained and focused use of resources of recent decades.

Yaralla Estate - Estate

The Dame Eadith Walker Estate comprises approximately 37 hectares (Sydney South West Area Health Service state the area as 50 acres/20.3ha of land, comprising a peninsula fronting the Parramatta River at Concord. It is a large estate which retains its rural elements such as grazing fields with horses, former orchard and vegetable garden areas (now lawn), extensive garden layout including parkland, rose garden, picking garden, extensive grotto work, a rockery, former tennis/croquet lawn, former swimming pool (in-filled and now lawn) and Italian lawn terrace. It also contains sporting and recreation facilities, such as the former swimming pool, tennis court/croquet green and a squash court.

Rietvallei Wine Estate - Estate

The estate comprises 250 hectares in total with 99 hectares under vineyard. The estate is still planted with predominantly white noble cultivars covering 63%, with red noble cultivars only 33%. The soil types vary from red calcareous clay-loam, to deep calcareous loam, and some sandy alluvial soil. Rietvallei soils have the capacity to promote concentrated sweetness in the grapes and this enhances the flavour and aroma of the fruit.

Handunugoda Tea Estate - Estate

The estate is 200 acre in extent and comprises 75 acre of tea. The balance plantation is of rubber, cinnamon and coconut. There is a well equipped tea factory on the property. Most machines were made in the United Kingdom and are over 140 years old. The factory is a living and working museum. The estate is not a mass producer of tea. Handunugoda makes very small quantities of the choicest teas, winning international recognition. Handunugoda produces the famous 'Virgin White Tea', a tea untouched by hand which has attracted attention from tea enthusiasts all over the world.

Lowbridge Estate - The estate

Parts of the estate had been owned by the Fothergill family since 1761. The principal house on the estate is Lowbridge House (c. 17,750 sq. ft.) which was rebuilt between 1833 and 1837 by Richard Fothergill II in the then-fashionable Romantic cottage orné style. A lodge house and a new drive were built at the same time as well as a lake and boathouse in front of the house.

Lowbridge Estate - The estate

The largest part of the estate is the Dry Howe Farm of about 1,888 acres which includes the farmhouse and a large part of Bannisdale Fell.

Lowbridge Estate - The estate

The Lowbridge Estate lies six miles north of Kendal in the Lake District National Park, England, off the A6 road.

Coldharbour Estate - Coldharbour Estate

The Coldharbour housing estate began developent in 1947 on the site of Coldharbour Farm, by then the last working farm in London, built by the Metropolitan Borough of Woolwich. It was created in a garden suburb style in order to house borough residents made homeless by The Blitz and young families. The majority of initial residents, therefore, were rehoused from Woolwich or Eltham, and to a lesser extent Plumstead, Charlton and surrounding boroughs.

Coldharbour Estate - Coldharbour Estate

Coldharbour Farm and subsequently the Coldharbour Estate were a civil parish of Kent until 1889 when it became part of the County of London and from 1900 formed part of the Metropolitan Borough of Woolwich. The metropolitan borough was abolished in 1965 and Coldharbour then became part of the Royal Borough of Greenwich.

Coldharbour Estate - Coldharbour Estate

The first house to be built, 2 Wynford Way, was opened by Aneurin Bevan, the Minister for Health, in 1947. The 'bottom end' of the estate was built first, with Wynford Way, Woodcroft, Littlemede and Bromhedge completed by the end of 1948, many of which were built in concrete due to post-war lack of building supplies. The area from the Mound to the Course and surrounding roads were open to residents the following year, with Southold Rise and Speke Hill complete by 1950. The roads surrounding the Farmhouse were ready by the end of 1951, Beanshaw in 1952 and finally the roads at the south of the estate, between Beanshaw and Hever Croft, were ready by 1953. The estate was due to be officially opened by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in May 1952, but that part of her tour was cancelled. When she finally arrived to "commemorate the completion of the Coldharbour Housing Estate" on 9 May 1957, the Kentish Independent 's headline the following day was "Five Year Wait For Royal Visit But It Was Well Worth It".

Excalibur Estate - The estate

Catford has a variety of shops and railway stations, the nearest railway station to the estate being Bellingham.