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ELMER guidelines - The guidelines

The Norwegian Ministry of Trade and Industry submitted the draft for public hearing in the autumn of 2005. The approved ELMER 2 guidelines was published in October 2006. The guidelines are being administered by the Brønnøysund Register Centre.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans - Future guidelines

The USDA has invited interested parties, including members of the general public, to participate and follow the development of the 2020–2025 edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. As mandated by the Agriculture Act of 2014, this next edition of the guidelines will cover the full life-span of Americans, as expansion of the guidelines are planned to include recommendations for pregnant women, infants, and children younger than 2 years old. The Trump Administration has proposed a budget of more than $12 million for the evaluation of scientific evidence, development of the 2020–2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and dissemination of the new edition to its target audience of policymakers, nutrition experts, and clinicians; this budget request has been supported by multiple organizations.

Ethical guidelines for treating trauma survivors - Guidelines

The following ethical guidelines should be considered when working with clients who have survived a traumatic experience:

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines - Earlier guidelines

Over 38 different Web access guidelines followed from various authors and organizations over the next few years. These were brought together in the Unified Web Site Accessibility Guidelines compiled at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Version 8 of the Unified Web Site Accessibility Guidelines, published in 1998, served as the starting point for the W3C's WCAG 1.0.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans - Current guidelines

The MyPlate initiative, based on the recommendations of the 2015—2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and produced by the USDA Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, is a nutrition education program directed at the general public, providing a guide to "finding healthy eating solutions to fit your lifestyle."

Dietary Guidelines for Americans - Current guidelines

The guidelines provide a general recommendation that people follow a healthy eating pattern with appropriate calories, and that the evaluation of ones eating pattern accounts for all foods and beverages, including snacks. The recommended healthy eating pattern includes:

Dietary Guidelines for Americans - Current guidelines

The current Dietary Guidelines for Americans (2015–2020) were developed in three stages, beginning with a review of scientific evidence, followed by development of the guidelines, and finally with implementation of the guidelines. Compared to previous guidelines, the 2015–2020 guidelines emphasized replacing saturated fats with unsaturated fats, particularly polyunsaturated fats, with the goal of preventing heart attack and stroke.

Human interface guidelines - Cross-platform guidelines

In contrast to platform-specific guidelines, cross-platform guidelines aren't tied to a distinct platform. These guidelines make recommendations which should be true on any platform. Since this isn't always possible, cross-platform guidelines may weigh the compliance against the imposed work load.

Dietary Guidelines for Americans - Current guidelines

The Dietary Guidelines also include a key recommendation to meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans.

TV Parental Guidelines - Development of the guidelines

Further, the proposal stated that the icons and associated content symbols would appear for 15 seconds at the beginning of all rated programming, and that the size of the icons would be increased. The revised guidelines were supported by leading family and child advocacy groups, as well as television broadcasters, cable systems and networks, and television production companies. Finally, the revised proposal called for five representatives of the advocacy community to be added to the TV Parental Guidelines Monitoring Board. On March 12, 1998, the Federal Communications Commission found that the Industry Video Programming Rating System was acceptable, and adopted technical requirements for the V-chip.

BPO standards and guidelines - Standards and guidelines

The standards include what BPO practitioners must adhere to, such as ethics, conduct, and disclosures, as well as proper application of techniques. The guidelines are more flexible in order to meet the diversity of requirements which are prevalent throughout the valuation industry, and are considerations.

TV Parental Guidelines - Development of the guidelines

On February 29, 1996, all segments of the entertainment industry, led by the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB), the National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA), and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), joined together and voluntarily pledged to create such a system. They agreed that the guidelines would be applied by broadcast and cable networks in order to handle the large amount of programming that must be reviewed – some 2,000 hours a day. The guidelines would be applied episodically to all programming based on their content, except for news, sports and advertising.

TV Parental Guidelines - Development of the guidelines

On December 19, 1996, the industry announced the creation of the TV Parental Guidelines, a voluntary system of guidelines providing parents with information to help them make more informed choices about the television programs their children watch. The guidelines were modeled after the movie ratings system created by the Motion Picture Association of America in 1968. The television industry agreed to insert a ratings icon on-screen at the beginning of all rated programs, and to encode the guidelines for use with the V-chip. The industry also created a Monitoring Board, composed of TV industry experts, to ensure accuracy, uniformity and consistency of the guidelines and to consider any public questions about the guideline applied to a particular program. The TV Parental Guidelines went into use on January 1, 1997.

National Physical Activity Guidelines - The 4 Guidelines

The guidelines are directed at adults. (scroll lower for children's guide lines)

UNGEGN Toponymic Guidelines - UN resolutions promoting Toponymic Guidelines

The title of the Toponymic Guidelines has been modified in 1982 and 1986. Whereas Breu in his sample used the title Toponymic Guidelines for International Cartography, the above-mentioned resolution nr. 4 of the 4th UN Conference on the Standardization of Geographical Names uses the title Toponymic guidelines for map and other editors. In 1986, on the 12th Session of the UNGEGN, it was decided to add for international use to the title.

UNGEGN Toponymic Guidelines - UN resolutions promoting Toponymic Guidelines

The echo on Breus proposal was positive. In the years to come four resolutions were adopted in favour of the promotion of Toponymic Guidelines. At the 4th UN Conference on the Standardization of Geographical Names (Geneva, August/September 1982) resolution nr. 4 was drafted, concerning the Publication of Toponymic Guidelines for map and other editors: This resolution presents a checklist on the contents of Guidelines and recommends that the Toponymic Guidelines submitted by Austria should serve as a sample of format and contents. It also recommends that a correspondent should be appointed by the UNGEGN to coordinate the work of developing national Toponymic Guidelines and to maintain communication with national experts involved in their elaboration.

UNGEGN Toponymic Guidelines - UN resolutions promoting Toponymic Guidelines

At the 6th UN Conference on the Standardization of Geographical Names (New York, August/September 1992) resolution nr. 14 recommends Toponymic Guidelines in combined volumes, in at least one of the working languages of the United Nations, and that provision should be made to issue the Guidelines in the World Cartography bulletin.

Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines - Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines International Conference

Attracting delegates from across the globe, the Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines International Conference contains the latest evidence-based research and developments in psychiatry. In July 2012, an inaugural conference "Outlining the evidence behind the guidance" was held to celebrate the 11th edition followed by a second conference in September 2014 to launch the 12th edition with the theme "Getting up-to-date: assimilating the latest evidence into practical guidance". Both conferences were attended by over one hundred delegates from around the world and provided the opportunity to hear written guidelines presented by the contributors and to participate in a question and answer session.

Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines - Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines International Conference

The third Maudsley Prescribing Guidelines International Conference "From evidence to practice" was held on Monday 17 December 2018 to celebrate the publication of the 13th edition. Over 200 clinicians attended; more than 50 from outside the UK.

Voluntary Voting System Guidelines - Voluntary Voting System Guidelines 2.0

The TGDC draft guidelines require software independence for all voting systems, in order to allow the correct outcome of an election to be determined even in the face of software bugs or vulnerabilities. According to the TGDC draft, software independence can be achieved through the use of independent voter verifiable records (IVVR) or through the innovation class. Additionally, the TGDC draft recommends open-ended vulnerability testing (OEVT), a testing method designed to bring greater security to voting systems in the polling place.

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