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San Mateo, Rizal - Manufactures

Various products are being manufactured in San Mateo. In fact, a group of different factories is found along Kambal Road, Barangay Guitnang Bayan 2. This includes San Mateo Rubber Corp. (Nikon and Durawalk Slippers), Jolly Food Corp., First Win Corp. (Slippers), and Golden Union Footwear Inc. (Evans Shoes). A Coca-Cola warehouse is also situated at Patiis Road corner GSIS Street (Daang Tubo) in Barangay Dulong Bayan 2. San Mateo also primarily manufactures gravel and sand aggregates together with other construction supplies that are found in hardware shops distributed all over the municipality.

Board of Manufactures

During the Enlightenment and the industrial revolution, Scottish industrial policy was made by the Board of Trustees for Fisheries, Manufactures and Improvements in Scotland, which sought to build an economy complementary, not competitive, with England. Since England had woollens, this meant linen.

International Exhibition of Arts and Manufactures

The International Exhibition of Arts and Manufactures was a world's fair held in Dublin in 1865 attended by almost 1 million visitors.

Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures

The Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures (S.U.M.) or Society for the Establishment of Useful Manufactures was a private state-sponsored corporation founded in 1791 to promote industrial development along the Passaic River in New Jersey in the United States. The company's management of the Great Falls of the Passaic River as a powersource for grist mills resulted in the growth of Paterson as one of the first industrial centers in the United States. Under the society's long-term management of the falls, the industrialization of the area passed through three great waves, centered first on cotton, then steel, and finally silk, over the course of over 150 years. The venture is considered by historians to have been a forerunner for many public–private partnerships in later decades in the United States.

United States House Committee on Manufactures

The Committee on Manufactures was assigned jurisdiction over matters relating "to the manufacturing industries." The Committee on Manufactures became inactive during the later years of its existence and was eliminated in 1911, at the beginning of the 62d Congress.

United States House Committee on Manufactures

First father-son pair to chair the same House Committee: Former President and Massachusetts Representative John Quincy Adams chaired the Committee on Manufactures from 1831 to 1841 and again from 1843 to 1847. His son, Charles Francis Adams of Massachusetts, chaired the same committee during the 36th Congress (1859–1861). Two other father-son pairs have since chaired the same committee.

Abraham Godwin - Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures

Alexander Hamilton had envisioned the Passaic Falls as a powerhouse for manufacturing since his first visit in 1778. While he was Treasury Secretary he led the Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures and they decided on the newly named Paterson. They met at the Godwin Hotel. Abraham led the group surveying the land surrounding the falls. Hamilton made the final call to place the factories right next to the falls rather than dig expensive canals to place them miles away. They all agreed.

United States House Committee on Manufactures

On December 8, 1819, an amendment was accepted in the House to separate the Committee on Commerce and Manufactures into the Committee on Commerce and Committee on Manufacturers. This followed a request from Philadelphia manufacturers for a separate committee, stating in a presentation to the House in 1815 that the Committee on Commerce and Manufactures was inadequate to represent manufacturing interests. An argument for the separate committees was that commerce and manufactures often had conflicting interests.

United States House Committee on Manufactures

United States House Committee on Manufactures was a standing committee of the U.S. House from 1819 to 1911.

California Midwinter International Exposition of 1894 - Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building

The Moorish-style Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building was located on the east end of the concourse, closest to the Panhandle. It was designed by Arthur Page Brown, and cost $113,000 to build. Divided into three sections, it featured manufactures, liberal arts, and ethnology/archaeology. The liberal arts division featured a display from University of California, Yale University, Cogswell Technical School, Mills College, and the California School for the Deaf and Dumb as well as the other private schools. There was also a display from the astronomical department of the Lick Observatory. The manufactures division featured many displays from the Columbian Exhibition in Chicago. The ethnology/archaeology division featured models, statues, inventions, and weapons from thirty-eight different locations on the globe. It was used as a store for commercial goods, with imports from across the globe. The building was the largest building in the fair, and considered the largest building in California at the time.

United States House Committee on Commerce and Manufactures - History and jurisdiction

The Committee on Commerce and Manufactures received petitions requesting the creation of new ports of entry and ports of delivery during nearly every Congress. Petitioners often complained that traveling great distances to the nearest port of entry was difficult, especially in bad weather. Most requests were not controversial, but there were a few cases of disagreement among petitioners. In 1800, Petersburg and Richmond, VA, submitted rival petitions for a collector's office, and in 1806 factions within Stonington, CT, submitted petitions both favoring and opposing a port of entry in that town. The committee was also involved in matters of compensation for customs house workers. Requests for increased pay and higher fees were received from weighers and measurers, collectors of customs, inspectors, and surveyors.

United States House Committee on Commerce and Manufactures

The United States House Committee on Commerce and Manufactures was a standing committee of the U.S. House from 1795 until 1819, when the two initially related subjects were split into the Committee on Commerce and the Committee on Manufactures. Its related committee in the U.S. Senate was the Senate Committee on Commerce and Manufactures, which was established in 1816, and similarly split in 1825.

United States Senate Committee on Commerce and Manufactures - History and activities

The Tariff of 1824 was a pivotal issue for the committee's established existence. In December 1825, the chairman, Mahlon Dickerson of New Jersey, proposed that the committee be split into separate committees—one for commerce and one for manufactures. Dickerson, a protectionist, believed that it was "improper to blend two subjects so distinct from each other as Commerce and Manufactures" and he was supported in his proposal by fellow Senator James Lloyd of Massachusetts, a free trader, who thought that low tariff advocates on the existing committee were a distinct minority. On the other hand, Robert Y. Hayne of South Carolina argued that such a division reflected narrow, sectional interests, and alternatively proposed that agriculture be added to give a single committee oversight of the Nation's economic interests. Dickerson's motion was adopted and the committee was split.

United States Senate Committee on Commerce and Manufactures

The United States Senate Committee on Commerce and Manufactures was one of the original standing committees created in the Senate in 1816, but it only lasted nine years, when it was split into the Committee on Commerce and the Committee on Manufactures. It functions are now under the jurisdiction of the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation.

United States House Committee on Commerce and Manufactures - History and jurisdiction

The standing Committee on Commerce and Manufactures was created in December 1795 to "take into consideration all such petitions and matters of things touching the commerce and manufactures of the United States, as shall be presented, or shall or may come into question, and be referred to them by the House, and to report their opinion thereupon, together with such propositions for relief therein, as to them shall be expedient." The records of the Committee on Commerce and Manufactures, during the 4th to 15th Congresses include many petitions and memorials and committee papers.

United States Senate Committee on Commerce and Manufactures - History and activities

The Committee on Commerce and Manufactures was established as one of the original standing committees, following adoption of a resolution proposed by James Barbour of Virginia on December 10, 1816. The committee`s records consist of petitions and memorials referred to the committee for the whole period and committee reports and papers from 1818.

Charles Babbage - On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures

Babbage published On the Economy of Machinery and Manufactures (1832), on the organisation of industrial production. It was an influential early work of operational research. John Rennie the Younger in addressing the Institution of Civil Engineers on manufacturing in 1846 mentioned mostly surveys in encyclopaedias, and Babbage's book was first an article in the Encyclopædia Metropolitana, the form in which Rennie noted it, in the company of related works by John Farey, Jr., Peter Barlow and Andrew Ure. From An essay on the general principles which regulate the application of machinery to manufactures and the mechanical arts (1827), which became the Encyclopædia Metropolitana article of 1829, Babbage developed the schematic classification of machines that, combined with discussion of factories, made up the first part of the book. The second part considered the "domestic and political economy" of manufactures.

Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce

The Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, founded in 1754, was the precursor of The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce now more usually known as the RSA. The original Society gained the Royal prefix in the Edwardian era, when the Prince of Wales was its President. Its primary aim was to stimulate industry through the awarding of prizes.

Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce - History

The name “Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce” was adopted, but this rather cumbersome title was fairly soon abbreviated to "The Society of Arts". The organisation grew in its first few years from the original 11 members to about 3,000; ladies became members quite early on, as Shipley had wished. Viscount Folkestone was the first President (1755-1761) and Lord Romney the second (1761-1793).

Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce - History

In 1908 the Society became the The Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce. Today it is more commonly known as The Royal Society of Arts or the RSA.

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