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Oregon Trail - Oregon

Arriving at the Columbia at The Dalles and stopped by the Cascade Mountains and Mount Hood, some gave up their wagons or disassembled them and put them on boats or rafts for a trip down the Columbia River. Once they transited the Cascade's Columbia River Gorge with its multiple rapids and treacherous winds they would have to make the 1.6 mi portage around the Cascade Rapids before coming out near the Willamette River where Oregon City was located. The pioneer's livestock could be driven around Mount Hood on the narrow, crooked and rough Lolo Pass.

Oregon Trail - Oregon

Several Oregon Trail branches and route variations led to the Willamette Valley. The most popular was the Barlow Road, which was carved though the forest around Mount Hood from The Dalles in 1846 as a toll road at $5 per wagon and 10 cents per head of livestock. It was rough and steep with poor grass but still cheaper and safer than floating goods, wagons and family down the dangerous Columbia River.

Oregon Trail - Oregon

Once across the Snake River ford near Old Fort Boise the weary travelers traveled across what would become the state of Oregon. The trail then went to the Malheur River and then past Farewell Bend on the Snake River, up the Burnt River canyon and northwest to the Grande Ronde Valley near present-day La Grande before coming to the Blue Mountains. In 1843 settlers cut a wagon road over these mountains making them passable for the first time to wagons. The trail went to the Whitman Mission near Fort Nez Perces in Washington until 1847 when the Whitmans were killed by Native Americans. At Fort Nez Perce some built rafts or hired boats and started down the Columbia; others continued west in their wagons until they reached The Dalles. After 1847 the trail bypassed the closed mission and headed almost due west to present day Pendleton, Oregon, crossing the Umatilla River, John Day River, and Deschutes River before arriving at The Dalles. Interstate 84 in Oregon roughly follows the original Oregon Trail from Idaho to The Dalles.

Oregon Trail - Oregon

In Central Oregon, there was the Santiam Wagon Road (established 1861), which roughly parallels Oregon Highway 20 to the Willamette Valley. The Applegate Trail (established 1846), cutting off the California Trail from the Humboldt River in Nevada, crossed part of California before cutting north to the south end of the Willamette Valley. U.S. Route 99 and Interstate 5 through Oregon roughly follow the original Applegate Trail.

David Hill (Oregon politician) - Oregon

Mr. Hill traveled on the Oregon Trail by wagon train to the Oregon Country. He arrived with Isaiah Kesley, Ralph Wilcox, Richard Williams, and Michael Moore. Once in Oregon he settled a land claim for 640 acre in Twality (sic) County, what is now Washington County, Oregon. The claim is in what is now Hillsboro with the recorded date of the claim is July 4, 1847. According to the claim record Hill started the claim in June 1842. With Kesley (Kelsey) and Williams recorded as arriving in Oregon in 1841, it is likely Hill arrived then as well. Hill likely arrived in October 1841 and then wintered with Joseph L. Meek, who he would later serve with in the legislature. David Hill married Lucinda Wilson June 4, 1846. On his land claim and built a cabin that was used for a time as the county courthouse. Also in February 1850 Hill was appointed guardian of five children of the Dunlap clan.

William Waldo (Oregon politician) - Oregon

After returning to Oregon permanently, William Waldo attended Willamette University in Salem. He then read law from future Oregon governor and Senator La Fayette Grover, passing the bar in 1863. After practicing law for a period he entered politics.

Oregon State Beavers football - Oregon

Oregon State University's primary rival is the University of Oregon. The two schools enjoy a fierce and long-standing rivalry due to the proximity of the two campuses. The University of Oregon is in Eugene, Oregon, about 40 mi south of Corvallis. The teams first matched up on the gridiron in 1894 and have been playing each other almost every year since. The rivalry game between the two schools is called the "Civil War" and is traditionally the last game of each season. They have played each other 121 times which makes it the seventh-oldest college football rivalry game.

Robert Moore (Oregon pioneer) - Oregon

Robert Moore traveled to Oregon over the Oregon Trail in 1839. He started out with the Farnham party from Peoria, Illinois, known as the Peoria Party. Moore joined the Shortess party briefly after the Peoria Party split at Bent’s Fort. He arrived in Oregon 1840 at Willamette Falls. Three of his ten children also immigrated west.

Interstate 84 (Oregon–Utah) - Oregon

Immediately after leaving Troutdale, I-84 and US 30 runs east along the south bank of the Columbia River (and the northern Oregon border, as well) for nearly 150 mi with the first 80 miles being in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, running from Troutdale to near by Biggs Junction, passing through the cities of Hood River and The Dalles in the Scenic Area. It also passes through It also passes through Biggs Junction, Arlington, and Boardman outside of the Scenic Area before heading southeast to the junction with southern end of I-82 immediately southeast of the Umatilla Chemical Depot near Hermiston. From the junction it continues southeast on to Pendleton.

David Leslie (Oregon politician) - Oregon

While still in New England, Leslie began work with the Methodist Episcopal Church. There he began a working relationship with Jason Lee. Lee then recruited Leslie to join the Methodist Mission in Oregon Country that Lee started in 1834. So in 1836, Leslie agreed to go to the Willamette Valley as the first set of reinforcements to the mission. Leslie, his wife Mary A. Kinney, and three daughters sailed around Cape Horn and arrived in Oregon on the Sumatra on September 7, 1837.

David Leslie (Oregon politician) - Oregon

Once in Oregon Lee assigned Leslie to be a magistrate for the area south of the Columbia River. Then in March 1838 Leslie was left in charge of the mission while Lee traveled back east again to secure more people for the mission in what would become the Great Reinforcement of 1839. After Lee returned Leslie helped to start a branch mission with William H. Willson at Nisqually on the Puget Sound in modern Washington State. Then in 1840 from August through September David Leslie was in charge of a small group that explored further north, nearly reaching Russian-America to look for other locations for future branches of the mission.

Robert Moore (Oregon pioneer) - Oregon

In 1840, after arriving, Moore began building Robin’s Nest across the river from Oregon City. He purchased the 1000 acre from a local Native American chief named Wanaxha. The town was later renamed Linn City in honor of Missouri Senator Lewis Linn who sponsored the Donation Land Claim Act. By 1845, Moore was also operating a ferry across the Willamette River to Oregon City.

Samuel Parker (Oregon politician) - Oregon

During the Cayuse War, a band of the Klamath tribe entered the Willamette Valley while the Oregon militia was on the east side of the Cascade Range. Parker was one of the volunteers who formed another militia in March 1848 that would battle the Klamath at the Battle of Abiqua, where he served as a captain.

William Waldo (Oregon politician) - Oregon

In 1878, he joined the Oregon State Senate, representing Marion County as a Republican. He continued to serve in the 1880 and 1882 sessions of the Oregon Legislative Assembly, with no session held in 1884. During the 1885 regular and special sessions of the legislature Waldo served as the President of the Senate.

John Minto (Oregon pioneer) - Oregon

Minto arrived in Oregon City on October 18, 1844. In early 1845 went to The Dalles to drive the cattle of Captain R.W. Morrison to the Willamette Valley, Morrison being part of the group that Minto had emigrated with. Prior to this journey, Minto had traveled to Fort Vancouver to get assistance from Doctor John McLoughlin of the Hudson's Bay Company. However, the doctor was out and they first dealt with James Douglas, McLoughlin’s later replacement as Chief Factor. Douglas put Minto and company up for the night, and the next day McLoughlin gave Minto some provisions for the journey to The Dalles and a boat to use. Once in The Dalles, Minto assisted the other travelers in his party who had been stranded there due to winter, and drove the cattle to the Willamette Valley.

Daniel Waldo (Oregon pioneer) - Oregon

In 1843, the Waldo family traveled the Oregon Trail to Oregon Country. They traveled with their neighbors the Applegates, including Jesse Applegate. Daniel spent most of the trip in a carriage on the journey due to poor health, but the group reach the Willamette Valley in 1843 and settled east of Salem, Oregon in an area now known as the Waldo Hills. The following year Daniel was elected to serve as a legislator in the Provisional Government. Waldo was a member of the provisional government when Oregon's controversial black exclusion laws were enacted.

Samuel Parker (Oregon politician) - Oregon

Arriving in the Willamette Valley in November 1845, Samuel Parker settled in Oregon City, Oregon. Samuel remarried in 1846 to Rosetta Spears. Parker would later move to present-day Marion County.

Oregon Trail - Oregon Country

In 1843, settlers of the Willamette Valley drafted the Organic Laws of Oregon organizing land claims within the Oregon Country. Married couples were granted at no cost (except for the requirement to work and improve the land) up to 640 acre (a section or square mile), and unmarried settlers could claim 320 acre. As the group was a provisional government with no authority, these claims were not valid under United States or British law, but they were eventually honored by the United States in the Donation Land Act of 1850. The Donation Land Act provided for married settlers to be granted 320 acre and unmarried settlers 160 acre. Following the expiration of the act in 1854 the land was no longer free but cost $1.25 per acre ($3.09/hectare) with a limit of 320 acre—the same as most other unimproved government land.

Interstate 84 (Oregon–Utah) - Oregon

In the Portland metropolitan area, I-84 is sometimes referred to as the "Banfield Freeway" or simply "the Banfield", although the official name is the Banfield Expressway. This freeway is named after Thomas H. "Harry" Banfield (1885–1950), the chairman of the Oregon Transportation Commission from 1943 to 1950. As I-84 heads east, it also follows US 30 in a majority of I-84 from Portland, Oregon to near Rupert, Idaho, with splits being variant in Oregon and Idaho, but before leaving Portland, there is a junction with I-205, along with cities Gresham, Fairview, Wood Village and Troutdale.

Route of the Oregon Trail - Oregon

Arriving at the Columbia at The Dalles and stopped by the Cascade Mountains and Mount Hood, some gave up their wagons or disassembled them and put them on boats or rafts for a trip down the Columbia River. Once they transited the Cascade's Columbia River Gorge with its multiple rapids and treacherous winds they would have to make the 1.6 mi portage around the Cascade Rapids before coming out near the Willamette River where Oregon City, Oregon was located. The pioneer's livestock could be driven around Mount Hood on the narrow, crooked and rough Lolo Pass.