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Restriction digest - Restriction site

A given restriction enzyme cuts DNA segments within a specific nucleotide sequence, at what is called a restriction site. These recognition sequences are typically four, six, eight, ten, or twelve nucleotides long and generally palindromic (i.e. the same nucleotide sequence in the 5' - 3' direction). Because there are only so many ways to arrange the four nucleotides that compose DNA (Adenine, Thymine, Guanine and Cytosine) into a four- to twelve-nucleotide sequence, recognition sequences tend to occur by chance in any long sequence. Restriction enzymes specific to hundreds of distinct sequences have been identified and synthesized for sale to laboratories, and as a result, several potential "restriction sites" appear in almost any gene or locus of interest on any chromosome. Furthermore, almost all artificial plasmids include a (often entirely synthetic) polylinker (also called "multiple cloning site") that contains dozens of restriction enzyme recognition sequences within a very short segment of DNA. This allows the insertion of almost any specific fragment of DNA into plasmid vectors, which can be efficiently "cloned" by insertion into replicating bacterial cells.

Restriction digest - Restriction site

After restriction digest, DNA can then be analysed using agarose gel electrophoresis. In gel electrophoresis, a sample of DNA is first "loaded" onto a slab of agarose gel (literally pipetted into small wells at one end of the slab). The gel is then subjected to an electric field, which draws the negatively charged DNA across it. The molecules travel at different rates (and therefore end up at different distances) depending on their net charge (more highly charged particles travel further), and size (smaller particles travel further). Since none of the four nucleotide bases carry any charge, net charge becomes insignificant and size is the main factor affecting rate of diffusion through the gel. Net charge in DNA is produced by the sugar-phosphate backbone. This is in contrast to proteins, in which there is no "backbone", and net charge is generated by different combinations and numbers of charged amino acids.

Restriction digest - Various restriction enzymes

There are numerous types of restriction enzymes, each of which will cut DNA differently. Most commonly used restriction enzymes are Type II restriction endonuclease (See article on Restriction enzymes for examples). There are some that cut a three base pair sequence while others can cut four, six, and even eight. Each enzyme has distinct properties that determine how efficiently it can cut and under what conditions. Most manufacturers that produce such enzymes will often provide a specific buffer solution that contains the unique mix of cations and other components that aid the enzyme in cutting as efficiently as possible. Different restriction enzymes may also have different optimal temperatures under which they function.

Restriction enzyme - Artificial restriction enzymes

Artificial ribonucleases that act as restriction enzymes for RNA are also being developed. A PNA-based system, called PNAzymes, has a Cu(II)-2,9-dimethylphenanthroline group that mimics ribonucleases for specific RNA sequence and cleaves at a non-base-paired region (RNA bulge) of the targeted RNA formed when the enzyme binds the RNA. This enzyme shows selectivity by cleaving only at one site that either does not have a mismatch or is kinetically preferred out of two possible cleavage sites.

Restriction enzyme - Artificial restriction enzymes

In 2017 a group in Illinois announced using an Argonaute protein taken from Pyrococcus furiosus (PfAgo) along with guide DNA to edit DNA as artificial restriction enzymes.

Restriction digest - Various restriction enzymes

Note that for efficient digest of DNA, the restriction site should not be located at the very end of a DNA fragment. The restriction enzymes may require a minimum number of base pairs between the restriction site and the end of the DNA for the enzyme to work efficiently. This number may vary between enzymes, but for most commonly used restriction enzymes around 6-10 base pair is sufficient.

Restriction enzyme - Artificial restriction enzymes

Artificial restriction enzymes can be generated by fusing a natural or engineered DNA binding domain to a nuclease domain (often the cleavage domain of the type IIS restriction enzyme FokI). Such artificial restriction enzymes can target large DNA sites (up to 36 bp) and can be engineered to bind to desired DNA sequences. Zinc finger nucleases are the most commonly used artificial restriction enzymes and are generally used in genetic engineering applications, but can also be used for more standard gene cloning applications. Other artificial restriction enzymes are based on the DNA binding domain of TAL effectors.

Restriction (mathematics) - Left- and right-restriction

. Similarly, one can define a right-restriction or range restriction

Combined bisulfite restriction analysis - Restriction Digest

PCR products are then treated with a restriction enzyme (e.g. BstUI), which will only cleave sites that were originally methylated (CGCG), while leaving sites that were originally unmethylated (TGTG). To ensure that all CpG sites are retained due to originally being methylated, and not a remnant of incomplete bisulfite conversion, a control digestion is performed, with enzymes such as Hsp92II which recognizes the sequence CATG, none of which should be remaining after bisulfite conversion (with the rare exception of non-CpG methylation) and thus no cleavage should occur if bisulfite conversion was complete.

Combined bisulfite restriction analysis - Restriction Digest

The above steps lead to the methylation dependent retention or loss of CpG-containing restriction enzyme sites, such as those for TaqI (TCGA) and BstUI (CGCG), depending on whether the cytosine residue was originally methylated or not, respectively. Due to the methylation-independent amplification in the above step, the resulting PCR products will be a mixed population of fragments that have lost or retained CpG-containing restriction enzyme sites, whose respective percentages will be directly correlated to the original level of DNA methylation in the sample DNA.

Restriction (mathematics) - Left- and right-restriction

. Indeed, one could define a restriction to n-ary relations, as well as to subsets understood as relations, such as ones of

Restriction (mathematics) - Left- and right-restriction

More generally, the restriction (or domain restriction or left-restriction)

Turn restriction routing - Examples of turn restriction routing

A turn restriction routing can be obtained by prohibiting at least one of the four possible clockwise turns and at least one of the four possible anti-clockwise turns in the routing algorithm. This means there are at least 16 (4x4) possible turn restriction routing techniques as you have 4 clockwise turns and 4 anti-clockwise turns to choose from. Some of these techniques have been listed below.

Turn restriction routing - Logic behind turn restriction routing

Logic behind turn restriction routing derives from a key observation. A cyclic acquisition of channels can take place only if all the four possible clockwise (or anti-clockwise) turns have occurred. This means deadlocks can be avoided by prohibiting at least one of the clockwise turns and one of the anti-clockwise turns. All the clockwise and anti-clockwise turns that are possible in a non restricted routing algorithm are shown in fig 2.

List of restriction enzyme cutting sites - Restriction enzymes catalog

The list includes some of the most studied examples of restriction endoncleases. The following information is given:

Distribution (mathematics) - Restriction

Unless U = V, the restriction to V is neither injective nor surjective. Lack of surjectivity follows since distributions can blow up towards the boundary of V. For instance, if U = R and V = (0, 2), then the distribution

Distribution (mathematics) - Restriction

Let U and V be open subsets of R n with V ⊂ U. Let E VU : D(V) → D(U) be the operator which extends by zero a given smooth function compactly supported in V to a smooth function compactly supported in the larger set U. Then the restriction mapping ρ VU is defined to be the transpose of E VU . Thus for any distribution T ∈ D′(U), the restriction ρ VU T is a distribution in the dual space D′(V) defined by

Archive (band) - Restriction

On 20 October 2014 Archive announced their upcoming album Restriction which was released on 12 January 2015. Videos for the tracks "Black And Blue", "Kid Corner" and "Feel It" are available for viewing on the official website.

Equation-free modeling - Restriction

The restriction operator often follows directly from the specific choice of the macroscale variables. For example, when the microscale model evolves an ensemble of many particles, the restriction typically computes the first few moments of the particle distribution (the density, momentum, and energy).

Methionine - Restriction

A 2005 study showed methionine restriction without energy restriction extends mouse lifespans. This extension requires intact growth hormone signaling, as animals without intact growth-hormone signaling do not have a further increase in lifespan when methionine restricted. The metabolic response to methionine restriction is also altered in mouse growth hormone signaling mutants.

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