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Scenic design - Scenic designer

In the process of planing, scenic designers often make models, ranging from very basic to extremely complex. Models are often made before the final drawings that are delivered to the scene shop for construction.

Scenic design - Scenic designer

A designer looks at the details searching for evidence through research to produce conceptual ideas that best support the content and values with visual elements. The subject of, “How do we generate creative ideas?” is very legitimate question. The most consuming part of expanding our horizons toward scenic concepts is much more than witnessing creativity, and creative people. It starts with us opening our mind to the possibilities. To have an attitude toward learning, seeking, and engaging in creativity and to be willing to be adventurous, inquisitive and curious. Our imagination is highly visual. Whether outside or inside, colorful trees or concerts, star lit skies or the architecture of a great building, scenic design is a process of discovery. Discovering what will best clarify and support the setting, environment, atmosphere, ambience, & world that is being created.

Scenic painting (theatre) - Scenic paint

Scenic paint has traditionally been mixed by the painter using pigment powder colour, a binder and a medium. The binder adheres the powder to itself and to the surface on which it is applied. The medium is a thinner which allows the paint to be worked more easily, disappearing as the paint dries. Today it is common to use brands of ready-made scenic paint, or pigment suspended in a medium to which a binder will be added.

Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad - Scenic excursions

CVSR offers scenic trips along the path of the Valley Railway.

Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway - Scenic byway designation

It was designated a National Forest Scenic Byway by the U.S. Forest Service on December 14, 1989.

Redmond–Bend Juniper State Scenic Corridor - Scenic Corridor

The Redmond–Bend Juniper State Scenic Corridor is not a typical park. There are no facilities on any of the scenic corridor parcels. In addition, camping, hunting, motorcycles, and off-road vehicles are not allowed on any part of the scenic corridor. Hiking and nature viewing are the only activities permitted within the scenic corridor boundaries. However, the individual parcels are small and none of them have any developed trails to facilitate hiking.

Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway - Scenic byway designation

The Enchanted Circle Scenic Byway was made one of the New Mexico Scenic Byways on July 31, 1998.

Redmond–Bend Juniper State Scenic Corridor - Scenic Corridor

The Redmond–Bend Juniper State Scenic Corridor is named for the large western junipers found in the area. Many of these juniper trees are several hundred years old. The scenic corridor is made up of ten separate parcels of land scattered along a 10 mi section of U.S. Route 97, between Bend and Redmond in Central Oregon. Most of the parcels are less than 40 acre. The parcels are bisected by the Route 97 forming a corridor with Oregon Parks and Recreation Department land on both side of the roadway as the highway passes through each parcel. The state scenic corridor covers a total of 352 acre. Additional scenic corridor land along Route 97 between Bend and Redmond is owned by Deschutes County. Together, the state and county scenic corridor lands cover approximately 600 acre.

Redmond–Bend Juniper State Scenic Corridor - Scenic Corridor

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is responsible for overseeing the Redmond–Bend Juniper State Scenic Corridor. The scenic corridor serves only as a buffer of native habitat along Route 97 between Bend and Redmond, giving the landscape along the highway corridor a natural high desert appearance. The department has no plans to develop any of the scenic corridor parcels.

Redmond–Bend Juniper State Scenic Corridor - Scenic Corridor

Accessing some of the scenic corridor parcels can be difficult. Only one parcel has direct road access from U.S. Route 97. That access point is not marked so it can be hard to locate along the highway. None of the other sites have access from Route 97. Many of the parcels are bordered by private property with no road connecting the state land to a public thoroughfare, making access to the parcels problematic. In addition, there are no signs identifying any of the parcels as state land. Geological survey markers are the only way to identify these lands as state property.

List of Nevada Scenic Byways - State scenic byways

Nevada's scenic byway program was established by the Nevada Legislature in 1983. The Nevada Department of Transportation is the primary agency responsible for the program, and its director has the authority to add new byways into the system.

Penghu National Scenic Area - Great Lion Scenic Area

Also located in Cimei, the Great Lion Scenic Area overlooks Longcheng (龍埕, "shaped like a dragon"). The name itself suggests what the place is like: standing high up on the hilltop looking down, visitors can actually see the body, the head and the tail of a dragon, even the foams splashed by the waves seem like white dragons swimming. Longcheng is an abrasion platform with pot holes and chessboard rocks.

List of Nevada Scenic Byways - State scenic byways

As of 2015, 20 road segments throughout Nevada have been designated as state scenic byways. The system comprises approximately 420 mi of roads. Fifteen of the state's scenic byways overlap with state-maintained highways.

List of New Jersey Scenic Byways - Palisades Scenic Byway

The Palisades Scenic Byway follows the Palisades Interstate Parkway between Fort Lee and the New York border, running along the New Jersey Palisades on the Hudson River in Bergen County and offering scenic overlooks.

Youghiogheny Scenic & Wild River - Wild and Scenic Rivers Act

The Youghiogheny Scenic and Wild River is considered to be an ecological greenway with a water trail, which is a piece of land that has been set aside to preserve open space. The water trail is the flowing Youghiogheny River. The Yough is one of the nine rivers that are recognized under the Maryland Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. The act was enacted by congress in 1968 and is meant to recognize and protect rivers with outstanding scenic, geological, ecological, historical, and cultural value. The Wild and Scenic Rivers act encourages the preservation and protection of the natural values of the river, strives for enhanced water quality to fulfill conservation purposes, and encourages the wise use of resources. The Yough is included under this act due to the substantial natural values it possesses, such as the outstanding white water, the scenic beauty of narrow, heavily forested gorges, and the abundance of trout fisheries. The act strives to keep the river in the free-flowing condition it is in. It is up to the state and local governments to enforce the act.

List of Nevada Scenic Byways - Nationally designated scenic byways

The National Scenic Byways program has four listings in Nevada, including one All-American Road. Additionally, one byway is part of the National Forest Scenic Byway program. All national byway designations comprise one or more of the Nevada scenic byways above.

National scenic area (Scotland) - List of national scenic areas

In 2010 there were 40 national scenic areas:

Youghiogheny Scenic & Wild River - Designation as Wild and Scenic

The portion of the Youghiogheny River located in Garrett County, Maryland is the wild and scenic portion. The State Scenic and Wild River System was created when the Maryland General Assembly passed the Scenic and Wild Rivers Act in 1968. The process of designating a river as scenic, wild, or both occurs in four steps:

National Scenic Area (United States) - Former National Scenic Areas

* East Mojave National Scenic Area,designated Mojave National Preserve in 1994

Youghiogheny Scenic & Wild River - Wild and Scenic Rivers Act

A Scenic and Wild Review Board is necessary to effectively enforce the act. The duties of the board members are to review, study, and plan. They are always to be looking for ways to improve the conditions of the river and review recommendations that have been made. One of their duties includes creating regulations that pertain to the river. For example, they prohibit federal support that could jeopardize the act. The board members also developed a regulation that maintains a balance between construction of dams and preservation of the river's natural state so they can enforce permanent protection on certain parts of the river. The members are also required to meet regularly and proceed with business with the advice and consent of the appropriate local governing body. Members of the board include the secretary of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the secretary of the Maryland Department of Agriculture and the secretary of the Environmental Protection Agency. Members also include the director of planning and a County Commissioner. Since the wild and scenic portion of the river runs through Garrett County, the Garrett County Commissioner is on the Board.

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