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Scene and sequel - Sequel

In addition to defining a scene, Swain described a sequel as a unit of transition that links two scenes, adding that a sequel functions to translate disaster into goal, telescope reality, and control tempo. Swain also described the structure of a sequel as (1) reaction, (2) dilemma, and (3) decision. Other authors have attempted to improve on the definition of a sequel and to explain its use and structure.

Sequel - Media shifting

A sequel to a popular but discontinued television series may be produced in another medium, thereby bypassing whatever factors led to the series' cancellation.

Sequel - Sequels of the novel

In addition to serving economic profit, the sequel was also used as a method to strengthen an author's claim to his literary property. With weak copyright laws and unscrupulous booksellers willing to sell whatever they could, in some cases the only way to prove ownership of a text was to produce another like it. Sequels in this sense are rather limited in scope, as the authors are focused on producing "more of the same" to defend their "literary paternity". As is true throughout history, sequels to novels provided an opportunity for authors to interact with a readership. This became especially important in the economy of the 18th century novel, in which authors often maintained readership by drawing readers back with the promise of more of what they liked from the original. With sequels, therefore, came the implicit division of readers by authors into the categories of "desirable" and "undesirable"—that is, those who interpret the text in a way unsanctioned by the author. Only after having achieved a significant reader base would an author feel free to alienate or ignore the "undesirable" readers.

Sequel - Media shifting

For example, the 1956 novel The Hundred and One Dalmatians, its 1961 animated adaptation and that film's 1996 live-action remake each have a sequel unrelated to the other sequels: respectively The Starlight Barking (1967), 101 Dalmatians II: Patch's London Adventure (2003, direct to video) and 102 Dalmatians (2000).

Sequel - Classifications

Midquel is a term used to refer to works which take place between events. There are different types of "midquels", such as interquels. Interquels are stories that take place in between two preceding stories and serve as a sequel to one, and a prequel to another simultaneously. For example, if 'movie C' is an interquel of 'movies A' and 'B', the events of 'movie C' take place after the events of 'movie A', but before the events of 'movie B'. Rogue One of the Star Wars Saga is an "interquel" since it takes place between Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith and Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope. Intraquels on the other hand are works which focus on events that place between the events of a single film. Examples include Beauty and the Beast: The Enchanted Christmas which takes place during Christmas between the beginning and the end of Beauty and the Beast, and Bambi II, which takes place during the gap between the death of Bambi's mother and the character's reappearance as a young adult in Bambi.

Sequel - Sequels of the novel

The origin of the sequel as we think of it in the 21st century developed from the novella and romance traditions in a slow process that culminated towards the end of the 17th century.

Sequel - Classifications

A legacy sequel is a work which follows the continuity of the original work(s), but takes place further along the timeline, often focusing on new characters with the original ones still present in the plot. Legacy sequels are sometimes also direct sequels that ignore previous installments entirely, effectively retconning preceding events. An example of this is Halloween (2018) which is a direct sequel to Halloween (1978). When a work is set in the same universe, yet has very little if any narrative connection to its predecessor, and can stand on its own without a thorough understanding of the franchise, the work can be referred to as a standalone sequel. 2 Fast 2 Furious, Mad Max: Fury Road, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, Son of the Mask and Cars 3 are examples of stand-alone movie sequels. A sequel to the first sequel might be referred to as a "third installment", a threequel, or a second sequel.

Sequel - Sequels of the novel

Dissociated from the motives of profit and therefore unrestrained by the need for continuity felt by male writers, Schellenberg argues that female-authored sequel fiction tended to have a much broader scope. He says that women writers showed an "innovative freedom" that male writers rejected to "protect their patrimony". For example, Sarah Fielding's Adventures of David Simple and its sequels Familiar Letters between the Principal Characters in David Simple and David Simple, Volume the Last are extremely innovative and cover almost the entire range of popular narrative styles of the 18th century.

Sequel

In movies, sequels are very common. There are many name formats for sequels. Sometimes, they either have unrelated titles or have a letter added on the end. More commonly, they have numbers at the end or have added words on the end. It is also common for a sequel to have a variation of the original title or have a subtitle. In the 1930s, many musical sequels had the year included in the title. Sometimes sequels are released with different titles in different countries, because of the perceived brand recognition. There are several ways that subsequent works can be related to the chronology of the original. Various neologisms have been coined to describe them.

Sequel

A sequel is a literature, film, theatre, television, music or video game that continues the story of, or expands upon, some earlier work. In the common context of a narrative work of fiction, a sequel portrays events set in the same fictional universe as an earlier work, usually chronologically following the events of that work.

Sequel - Media franchises

In some cases, the characters or the settings of an original film or video game become so valuable that they develop into a media franchise. Generally, a whole series of sequels is made, along with merchandising. Multiple sequels are often planned well in advance and actors and directors may sign extended contracts to ensure their participation. This can extend into a franchise's initial production's plot to provide story material to develop for sequels called sequel hooks.

Sequel - Media shifting

Sequels are most often produced in the same medium as the previous work (e.g. a film sequel is usually a sequel to another film). Producing sequels to a work in another medium has recently become common, especially when the new medium is less costly or time-consuming to produce.

Sequel - Box office

Movie sequels do not always do as well at the box office as the original, but they tend to do better than non-sequels, according to a study in the July 2008 issue of the Journal of Business Research. The shorter the period between releases, the better the sequel does at the box office. Sequels also show a faster drop in weekly revenues relative to non-sequels.

Sequel - History

In The Afterlife of a Character, David Brewer describes a reader's desire to "see more", or to know what happens next in the narrative after it has ended. This capacity for expansive curiosity is certainly not restricted to a particular era in human history. Indeed, we can point to Homer's Odyssey as a sequel to the Iliad in the sense that it expands upon plot and character elements established in the first text. That both the Odyssey and the Iliad were written in the 8th century B.C.E. and are traditionally held to represent the first extant works of western literature lends credence to the ubiquity of sequels in literary history. The Judeo-Christian Bible is also a common referent in that sense; many of the works included in the Hebrew Scriptures can be classified as sequels in that they continue and expand on a very general narrative that is pre-established by previous books in the same collection. In addition, the development of an official canon allows for the distinction between official and unofficial sequels; in this context, apocrypha might be considered an early form of informal sequel literature. Sequels, then, become an important facet of Western literature throughout history. The medieval genre of chivalric romance, in particular, contains massive networks of prequel and sequel literature.

Sequel

In many cases, the sequel continues elements of the original story, often with the same characters and settings. A sequel can lead to a series, in which key elements appear repeatedly. Although the difference between more than one sequel and a series is somewhat arbitrary, it is clear that some media franchises have enough sequels to become a series, whether originally planned as such or not.

Sequel (disambiguation)

Sequel may refer to:

Sequel (album)

Sequel is the ninth studio album by the American singer-songwriter Harry Chapin, released in 1980 (see 1980 in music). It was the last complete album released during Harry's lifetime. A tenth studio album, The Last Protest Singer, made up of material he was working on at the time of his death, was released about seven years after he died.

Chevrolet Sequel

The Chevrolet Sequel was a purpose-built hydrogen fuel cell-powered concept car and sport utility vehicle from Chevrolet, employing the then latest generation of General Motors' fuel cell technology.

Chevrolet Sequel - Characteristics

The Sequel is just short of five metres long (4994 mm, 196.1 in.), on a similarly long (3040 mm, 119.7 in.) wheelbase, in order to accommodate the extremely long fuel tanks.

Chevrolet Sequel - Characteristics

The Sequel stores 8 kg of gaseous hydrogen in three cylindrical, carbon-composite fuel tanks, pressurized to 700 bar (10,000 p.s.i.) and mounted longitudinally beneath the cabin floor. As a result, the range of the vehicle is more than 480 km.

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