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Lisbon Strategy - Strategy

Translation of the Lisbon Strategy goals into concrete measures led to the extension of the Framework Programmes for Research and Technological Development (FPs) into FP7 and the Joint Technology Initiatives (JTI).

Lisbon Strategy - Strategy

The main fields were economic, social, and environmental renewal and sustainability. The Lisbon Strategy was heavily based on the economic concepts of:

Strategy - Counterterrorism Strategy

Because counterterrorism involves the synchronized efforts of numerous competing bureaucratic entities, national governments frequently create overarching counterterrorism strategies at the national level. A national counterterrorism strategy is a government’s plan to use the instruments of national power to neutralize terrorists, their organizations, and their networks in order to render them incapable of using violence to instill fear and to coerce the government or its citizens to react in accordance with the terrorists’ goals. The United States has had several such strategies in the past, including the United States National Strategy for Counterterrorism (2018); the Obama-era National Strategy for Counterterrorism (2011); and the National Strategy for Combatting Terrorism (2003). There have also been a number of ancillary or supporting plans, such as the 2014 Strategy to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, and the 2016 Strategic Implementation Plan for Empowering Local Partners to Prevent Violent Extremism in the United States. Similarly, the United Kingdom's counterterrorism strategy, CONTEST, seeks "to reduce the risk to the UK and its citizens and interests overseas from terrorism, so that people can go about their lives freely and with confidence."

European Employment Strategy - Strategy

The European Employment Strategy is built around priority themes under the four pillars of employability, entrepreneurship, adaptability and equal opportunities. Each year, the Member States draw up National Action Plans on Employment (NAPS) implementing these broad policy guidelines. The NAPS are analysed by the Commission and the Council, and the results, presented in a Joint Employment Report, serve as a basis for reprioritising and making recommendations to Member States in respect of their employment policies.

Alternative mating strategy - Strategy

In any case, the mating strategies employed by organisms in various situations will ultimately depend on the strength of selection acting to maintain or eliminate certain reproductive strategies. If sexual selection strongly favors one mating strategy over a potential alternative, individuals not conforming to the successful strategy will fail to reproduce, thus preventing future generations from inheriting the unsuccessful strategy.

European Employment Strategy - Strategy

Five years after its launch, the European strategy entered a review phase.

European Employment Strategy - Strategy

In January 2003, the Commission adopted a communication presenting a new approach through the European Employment Strategy, better adapted to the needs of an ageing population, increasing women's participation in the labour market, enlargement and the increasing pace of economic change. Main priorities of the new strategy are full employment and better working conditions.

Alternative mating strategy - Strategy

Most of the organisms in question do not have the cognitive capacity to “strategize” in the human sense of the word, so what is a strategy? Here, a strategy is an underlying rule for making decisions about a certain behaviour. A strategy provides an organism with a set of tactics that are adaptive in various circumstances. A tactic is an action taken to achieve a specific goal. For example, a wolf encounters a fallen tree and its strategy is defined by two tactics that may allow the wolf to pass the obstacle: jump over it or crawl under it. Considering the current environmental conditions, the surroundings, and the size of the tree, the wolf will decide between the tactics dictated by its strategy. In the context of a mating system, this means that individuals in a given population have strategies that allow them to obtain mates in different ways to maximize their reproductive success given their phenotypic, environmental, or social circumstances.

Alternative mating strategy - Strategy

It is important to recognize that organisms within a population may not always have the same strategy, and different strategies may offer individuals either a range of tactical options or just one tactic. Furthermore, given strategy may be considered Mendelian, developmental, conditional, or a combination of the above. A Mendelian strategy depends on a genetically determined phenotypic difference, such as body size. This is the case in marine isopods, described below. Developmentally driven strategies are associated with phenotypic differences caused by varying conditions during the course of development that affect body size or overall adult health. Individuals may also have a conditional behaviour strategy that depends not on the genetic or developmental impact on one's life circumstance, but on external factors. These may include the number of available mates, or the number of nearby competitors and their employed tactics. Additionally, some mating strategies will be impacted by the interaction of multiple factors, so these categorizations of Mendelian, developmental, and conditional are not mutually exclusive. They simply offer ways to think about alternative mating strategies and their root causes.

Military strategy - War strategy

Once the Second World War had begun with France and Britain as allies, German strategy aimed to win a short war in France and to force Britain to the negotiating table. After the conquest of France in May-June 1940, Churchill's refusal to surrender or to negotiate on terms favorable for Germany put the German gamble in jeopardy. Germany could not match Britain on the open sea and had not prepared its army for operations across the Channel. Instead, the Wehrmacht hoped to strangle Britain's economy through success in the Battle of the Atlantic (1939-1945) and the Battle of Britain (1940).

Strategy implementation - Strategy monitoring

Monitoring these measures will help the organisation members in controlling that the strategy is being implemented successfully and if not in making them take decisions that will allow them to achieve the strategy. Strategy control, in turn, provides timely and valid feedback about organisational performance so that change and adaptation become a routine part of the implementation effort. Controls allow for the revision of execution-related factors if desired goals are not being met.

Strategy implementation - Strategy articulation

The purpose of articulating the strategy is to translate the strategy into a form where managers and stakeholders agree consensually on what needs to be achieved

Strategy implementation - Strategy communication

Part of this strategy translation is to assign responsibilities (Owen, 1982) across the organisations members, not only as to engage them but also to monitor and control that each of the operating objectives is being taken care of.

Marketing strategy - Strategy typologies

Developing competitive strategy requires significant judgement and is based on a deep understanding of the firm's current situation, its past history and its operating environment. No heuristics have yet been developed to assist strategists choose the optimal strategic direction. Nevertheless, some researchers and scholars have sought to classify broad groups of strategy approaches that might serve as broad frameworks for thinking about suitable choices.

Military strategy - War strategy

Hitler's strategy for war is usually thought to be that laid out in Mein Kampf (1926/1926), although historiographers debate whether Hitler intended global or merely European conquest, or whether he even had a plan for war in advance - see Nazi foreign policy (historiographic debate). In Mein Kampf, Hitler had imagined a short war against France, and then the conquest of the USSR. He had wrongly assumed that Britain would be a German ally in the west against France, and so he did not foresee an enduring war in the west.

Aggressiveness strategy - Defender strategy

This strategy entails a decision not to aggressively pursue markets. As a result, they tend to do none of the things prospectors do. A defender strategy entails finding, and maintaining a secure and relatively stable market. Rather than being on the cutting edge of technological innovation, product development, and market dynamics; a defender tries to insulate themselves from changes wherever possible.

Strategy implementation - Strategy monitoring

Monitoring or evaluation should begin early on in order to cut an errant strategy before losses or negative impacts become too costly or damaging.

Strategy game - Team strategy

One of the most focused team strategy games is contract bridge. This card game consists of two teams of two players, whose offensive and defensive skills are continually in flux as the game's dynamic progresses. Some argue that the benefits of playing this team strategy card game extend to those skills and strategies used in business and that the playing of these games helps to automate strategic awareness.

Strategy implementation - Strategy communication

In other words, the business strategy must be translated into a set of clear short-term operating objectives (activities and outcomes) in order to execute the strategy. Key issues, elements, and needs of strategy must be translated into objectives, action plans, and “scorecards” and this translation is an integral and vital part of the execution process. Developing this set of clear objectives, that relates logically to the strategy and how the organisation plans to compete, is an important aspect of an effective implementation process (Owen, 1982). Having a concrete, detailed and comprehensive implementation plan can have a positive influence on the level of success of an implementation effort. In addition it helps identify what will be required in terms of resources, capabilities and time.

Strategy game - Abstract strategy

A purist's definition of an abstract strategy game requires that it cannot have random elements or hidden information. This definition includes such games as chess, Go and Arimaa (a game with multiple moves within a turn). However, many games are commonly classed as abstract strategy games which do not meet these criteria: games such as backgammon, Octiles, Can't Stop, Sequence and Mentalis have all been described as "abstract strategy" games despite having a chance element. A smaller category of non-perfect abstract strategy games incorporate hidden information without using any random elements; for example, Stratego.

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