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Supermarket Secrets - Summer's Supermarket Secrets

Rachel Ward of The Daily Telegraph gave the episode three out of five stars and said "the programme delivered little in the way of shocking, revealing or dirty secrets". The Guardian Lucy Mangan said: "Summer's Supermarket Secrets was essentially one of those filmed-in-a-factory Sesame Street segments extended and presented by Animal." The Daily Express listed it as one of their picks of the day. Tom Sutcliffe, writing for The Independent, said: "It was an infuriatingly interesting programme this. Infuriating because you might have hoped for a slightly more questioning attitude to such powerful operators in our daily lives." The Daily Mail gave it three out of five stars and said: "I was disappointed that some of the 'secrets' uncovered weren't a little murkier, but the programme was incredibly informative and entertaining — even if Gregg does need to dial it down several notches for the sake of all our eardrums." Express & Star journalist Robert Taylor said: And really, we shouldn't be surprised that this show managed to sputter into life given the recent trend of PR schemes masquerading as television programmes. It's just that in many ways Supermarket Secrets is even more egregious than Sky 1's Greggs: More Than Meats the Pie. At least that show doesn't gussy itself up like a consumer advice documentary. In fact, much of the show felt directly lifted from a corporate pamphlet.

Supermarket Secrets - Autumn's Supermarket Secrets

The Guardian John Crace said Gregg Wallace failed to ask supermarkets tricky questions about profits, packaging, ethics, food miles, waste, battery chickens. ... Far from revealing any secrets, the story in which Wallace seemed most interested was just what an amazing job the supermarkets were doing to bring us all the different foods and household products we wanted. Over on the commercial channels, supermarkets have to pay for adverts like this. The closest to criticism that Wallace got was to make a few lame jokes. ... There are any number of secrets that a half-awake presenter might have wanted to prise out of the supermarkets. Claire Winter of Time Out gave the episode three out of five stars and said: "Supermarket Secrets is packed with good-to-know information, but can’t quite overcome a base blandness that lacks the kick to make it more than just good for our health." The Times also gave the episode three out of five stars. The Independent nominated the episode as one of their television choices of the day. The Daily Mail gave the episode two out of five stars.

Springland - Supermarket

Springland International operates its supermarket business under the trade name of Datonghua (Chinese: 大統華).

Somba Opu, Gowa - Supermarket

* Satu Sama Supermarket

Grocery store - Supermarket

A supermarket, a large form of the traditional grocery store, is a self-service shop offering a wide variety of food and household products organized into aisles. The supermarket typically comprises meat, fresh produce, dairy, and baked goods aisles, along with shelf space reserved for canned and packaged goods as well as for various non-food items such as kitchenware, household cleaners, pharmacy products and pet supplies.

Supermarket Sweep (British game show) - Round Robin/Dale's Daily/Supermarket Swap

If a team answer a question correctly, it wins 10 seconds; right or wrong, contestants then switch with their partners tasked with answering the next question. The categories can be: TV, Movies, Music, or Hot Gossip. In the 2019 revival, each correct answer wins the teams 5 seconds for their clocks and there were also "Supermarket Steal" questions in which if answered correctly allows a team to steal 5 seconds from an opposing team.

Supermarket - History

Other established American grocery chains in the 1930s, such as Kroger and Safeway at first resisted Cullen's idea, but eventually were forced to build their own supermarkets as the economy sank into the Great Depression, while consumers were becoming price-sensitive at a level never experienced before. Kroger took the idea one step further and pioneered the first supermarket surrounded on all four sides by a parking lot.

Supermarket - History

Historically, there has been debate about the origin of the supermarket, with King Kullen and Ralphs of California having strong claims. Other contenders included Weingarten's Big Food Markets and Henke & Pillot. To end the debate, the Food Marketing Institute in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institution and with funding from H.J. Heinz, researched the issue. They defined the attributes of a supermarket as "self-service, separate product departments, discount pricing, marketing and volume selling".

Supermarket - Layout strategies

Marketers use well-researched techniques to try to control purchasing behavior. The layout of a supermarket is considered by some to consist of a few rules of thumb and three layout principles. The high-draw products are placed in separate areas of the store to keep drawing the consumer through the store. High impulse and high margin products are placed in the most predominant areas to grab attention. Power products are placed on both sides of the aisle to create increased product awareness, and end caps are used to receive a high exposure of a certain product whether on special, promotion or in a campaign, or a new line.

Supermarket

Supermarkets typically are chain stores, supplied by the distribution centers of their parent companies thus increasing opportunities for economies of scale. Supermarkets usually offer products at relatively low prices by using their buying power to buy goods from manufacturers at lower prices than smaller stores can. They also minimise financing costs by paying for goods at least 30 days after receipt and some extract credit terms of 90 days or more from vendors. Certain products (typically staple foods such as bread, milk and sugar) are very occasionally sold as loss leaders so as to attract shoppers to their store. Supermarkets make up for their low margins by a high volume of sales, and with of higher-margin items bought by the attracted shoppers. Self-service with shopping carts (trolleys) or baskets reduces labor cost, and many supermarket chains are attempting further reduction by shifting to self-service check-out.

Supermarket

A larger full-service supermarket combined with a department store is sometimes known as a hypermarket. Other services may include those of banks, cafés, childcare centres/creches, insurance (and other financial services), Mobile Phone services, photo processing, video rentals, pharmacies or petrol stations. If the eatery in a supermarket is substantial enough, the facility may be called a "grocerant", a blend of "grocery" and "restaurant".

Supermarket - History

In the United Kingdom, self-service shopping took longer to become established. Even in 1947, there were just ten self-service shops in the country. In 1951, ex-US Navy sailor Patrick Galvani, son-in-law of Express Dairies chairman, made a pitch to the board to open a chain of supermarkets across the country. The UK's first supermarket under the new Premier Supermarkets brand opened in Streatham, South London, taking ten times as much per week as the average British general store of the time. Other chains caught on, and after Galvani lost out to Tesco's Jack Cohen in 1960 to buy the 212 Irwin's chain, the sector underwent a large amount of consolidation, resulting in 'the big four' dominant UK of today: Tesco, Asda (owned by Wal-Mart), Sainsbury's and Morrisons.

Supermarket - Layout strategies

Consumer psychologists suggest that most buyers tend to enter the store and shop to their right first. Some supermarkets, therefore, choose to place the entrance to the left-hand side as the consumer will likely turn right upon entry, and this allows the consumer to do a full anticlockwise circle around the store before returning to the checkouts. This suggests that supermarket marketers should use this theory to their advantage by placing their temporary displays of products on the right-hand side to entice you to make an unplanned purchase. Furthermore, aisle ends are extremely popular with product manufacturers, who pay top dollar to have their products located there. These aisle ends are used to lure customers into making a snap purchase and to also entice them to shop down the aisle. The most obvious place supermarket layout influences consumers are at the checkout. Small displays of chocolates, magazines, and drinks are located at each checkout to tempt shoppers while they wait to be served.

Supermarket - Layout strategies

Every aspect of the store is mapped out and attention is paid to color, wording and even surface texture. The overall layout of a supermarket is a visual merchandising project that plays a major role. Stores can creatively use a layout to alter customers’ perceptions of the atmosphere. Alternatively, they can enhance the store’s atmospherics through visual communications (signs and graphics), lighting, colors, and even scents. For example, to give a sense of the supermarket being healthy, fresh produce is deliberately located at the front of the store. In terms of bakery items, supermarkets usually dedicate 30 to 40 feet of store space to the bread aisle.

Supermarket - Online-only supermarkets (21st century)

During the dot-com boom, an online-only supermarket startup called Webvan was formed, but it went bankrupt after 3 years and was acquired by Amazon. The British online supermarket Ocado, which uses a high degree of automation in its warehouses, was the first successful online-only supermarket. Ocado has now expanded into providing services to multiple other supermarket firms such as Waitrose and Morrisons. Regular grocery stores such as Walmart have started to employ food delivery services offered by third parties (i.e. DoorDash). Sainsbury’s Streatham Common store for instance has started to deliver food by means of an e-bike food delivery service. Also, robotic delivery of food is being offered by various companies partnering with supermarkets.

Supermarket - History

They determined that the first true supermarket in the United States was opened by a former Kroger employee, Michael J. Cullen, on 4 August 1930, inside a 6000 sqft former garage in Jamaica, Queens in New York City. The store, King Kullen, operated under the slogan "Pile it high. Sell it low." At the time of Cullen's death in 1936, there were seventeen King Kullen stores in operation. Although Saunders had brought the world self-service, uniform stores, and nationwide marketing, Cullen built on this idea by adding separate food departments, selling large volumes of food at discount prices and adding a parking lot.

Supermarket - Layout strategies

The third principle is consumer convenience. The layout of a supermarket is designed to create a high degree of convenience to the consumer to make the shopping experience pleasant and increase customer spending. This is done through the character of merchandising and product placement. There are many different ideas and theories in relation to layout and how product layout can influence the purchases made. One theory suggests that certain products are placed together or near one another that are of a similar or complementary nature to increase the average customer spend. This strategy is used to create cross-category sales similarity. In other words, the toothpaste is next to or adjacent the toothbrushes and the tea and coffee are down the same aisle as the sweet biscuits. These products complement one another and placing them near is one-way marketers try to increase purchases.

Supermarket

A supermarket is a self-service shop offering a wide variety of food, beverages and household products, organized into sections and shelves. It is larger and has a wider selection than earlier grocery stores, but is smaller and more limited in the range of merchandise than a hypermarket or big-box market.

Supermarket

The traditional supermarket occupies a large amount of floor space, usually on a single level. It is usually situated near a residential area in order to be convenient to consumers. The basic appeal is the availability of a broad selection of goods under a single roof, at relatively low prices. Other advantages include ease of parking and frequently the convenience of shopping hours that extend into the evening or even 24 hours of the day. Supermarkets usually allocate large budgets to advertising, typically through newspapers. They also present elaborate in-shop displays of products.

Supermarket - Layout strategies

The first principle of the layout is circulation. Circulation is created by arranging product so the supermarket can control the traffic flow of the consumer. Along with this path, there will be high-draw, high-impulse items that will influence the consumer to purchase which he or she did not intend. Service areas such as restrooms are placed in a location which draws the consumer past certain products to create extra buys. Necessity items such as bread and milk are found at the rear of the store to increase the start of circulation. Cashiers' desks are placed in a position to promote circulation. The entrance will be on the right-hand side because research has shown that consumers who travel in a counter-clockwise direction spend more.

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