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Telecommunications in Sweden - Telecommunications

Sweden liberalized its telecommunications industry starting in 1980s and being formally liberalized in 1993. This was three years ahead of USA and five years before the European common policy introduced in January 1998 allowed for an open and competitive telecommunication market. The Swedes, most of who are computer literate, enjoy a continuous growth in the Internet market and the availability of technologies such as Metro Ethernet, fiber, satellite, WAN access technologies and even the availability of 3G services. Statistically, 6.447 (2004) million telephone main lines are in use, 8.0436 (2005) million mobile cellular telephones are in use and 6.7 million Swedes are regular internet users.

Myanma Posts and Telecommunications - Telecommunications

MPT, also known as Myanmar Posts and Telecommunications (Burmese: မြန်မာ့ဆက်သွယ်ရေးလုပ်ငန်း) is the first and leading telecommunications operator in Myanmar and has been championing the development of the telecommunications industry for over 130 years. It provides both fixed and mobile telecommunication services to people and enterprises, including nationwide largest 3G network and MIMO 4X4 powered data service known as LTE+.

Telecommunications in Turkey - Telecommunications liberalisation

Telecommunications liberalisation in Turkey is progressing, but at a slow pace. The Telecommunication Authority (now renamed Bilgi İletişim ve Teknolojileri Kurumu or BTK), while technically an independent organization, is still controlled by the Ministry of Transport and Communications.

Telecommunications in Turkey - Telecommunications liberalisation

The telecommunications liberalisation process started in Turkey in 2004 after the creation of the Telecommunication Authority, and is still ongoing as of May 2013. Private sector companies operate in mobile telephony, long distance telephony and Internet access. There were 16.5 million fixed phone lines, 62.8 million mobile phone subscribers, and 6.2 million broadband subscribers by December 2009.

Telecommunications in Lesotho - Telecommunications providers

Vodacom Lesotho started operating in 1996 with the Government of Lesotho as a shareholder through its stake in Lesotho Telecommunications Corporation. When the Government of Lesotho began its privatisation process in 1999, it invited bids for this share in Vodacom Lesotho. In July 2000, Sekha-Metsi Consortium, a group of local business people and public figures, was announced as the successful bidder. Sekha-Metsi now holds a 12% share in Vodacom Lesotho with the remaining share held by Vodacom Group. In 2008 Vodacom Lesotho introduced its new partnership with Vodafone.

Telecommunications in Seychelles - Internet and telecommunications

In his inauguration speech, National Youth Council chairman Lenny Lebon said: “It is indeed a memorable day for all the youth and children of Praslin since from this moment we are no more on an outer island but linked to the global network of cyberspace.” Natasha Lesperance, of the Youth Service Bureau, praised the vision of targeting young people to build a modern future for the Seychelles nation with telecommunications and believed that internet cafés opening in different districts would "wean young people and children away from all vices in society, which will eventually help to build a vibrant knowledge-based society that can stand shoulder to shoulder with any developed nation in the world".

Telecommunications in American Samoa - ASTCA Telecommunications Building

The ASTCA Telecommunications Building (also known as the Tafuna Telecommunications Building) in Tafuna is the tallest building in American Samoa (it is 4 stories tall). Out of the tallest buildings of each U.S. state and territory, the ASTCA Telecommunications Building is the shortest. Construction of the building began in 2009 and ended in 2011.

Telecommunications in New Zealand - Telecommunications Development Levy

The government charges a $50 million Telecommunications Development Levy annually to fund improvements to communications infrastructure such as the Rural Broadband Initiative. It is payable by telecommunications firms with an operating revenue of over $10 million, in proportion to their qualified revenue.

Telecommunications network - Benefits of telecommunications and networking

Telecommunications facilitates interaction and information transfer over large distances. Businesses use telecommunications to expand and grow their networks. With Internet, computer, and telephone networks, businesses can allocate their resources efficiently. These core types of networks will be discussed below: network: a network consists of devices connected to one another. Information can be transferred from one device to the next. For example, an office filled with can share files together on each separate device. networks can range from a local area network (LAN) to a wide area network (WAN). The difference between the types of networks is the size. These types of networks work at certain speeds, also known as broadband. The Internet network connects worldwide. Internet network: access to the network allows users to use many resources. Over time the Internet network will replace books. This will enable users to discover information almost instantly and apply concepts to different situations. The Internet can be used for recreational, governmental, educational, and other purposes. Businesses in particular use the Internet network for research or to service customers and clients. Telephone network: the telephone network connects people to one another. This network can be used in a variety of ways. Many businesses use the telephone network to route calls and/or service their customers. Some businesses use a telephone network on a greater scale through a private branch exchange. It is a system where a specific business focuses on routing and servicing calls for another business. Majority of the time, the telephone network is used around the world for recreational purposes.

Telecommunications in China - History of telecommunications services

The primary form of telecommunications in the 1980s was local and long-distance telephone service administered by six regional bureaus: Beijing (north region), Shanghai (east region), Xi'an (northwest region), Chengdu (southwest region), Wuhan (centralsouth region), and Shenyang (northeast region). These regional headquarters served as switching centers for provincial-level subsystems. By 1986 China had nearly 3 million telephone exchange lines, including 34,000 long-distance exchange lines with direct, automatic service to 24 cities. By late 1986 fiber optic communications technology was being employed to relieve the strain on existing telephone circuits. International service was routed through overseas exchanges located in Beijing and Shanghai. Guangdong Province had coaxial cable and microwave lines linking it to Hong Kong and Macau.

Telecommunications in China - History of telecommunications services

As of 1987 the quality of telecommunications services in China had improved markedly over earlier years. A considerable influx of foreign technology and increased domestic production capabilities had a major impact in the post-Mao period.

Telecommunications in China - History of telecommunications services

In 1987 the Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications (now the Ministry of Information Industry) administered China's telecommunications systems and related research and production facilities. Besides postal services, some of which were handled by electronic means, the ministry was involved in a wide spectrum of telephone, wire, telegraph, and international communications (see Postage stamps and postal history of the People's Republic of China). The Ministry of Radio and Television was established as a separate entity in 1982 to administer and upgrade the status of television and radio broadcasting. Subordinate to this ministry were the Central People's Broadcasting Station, Radio Beijing, and China Central Television. Additionally, the various broadcasting training, talent-search, research, publishing, and manufacturing organizations were brought under the control of the Ministry of Radio and Television. In 1986 responsibility for the movie industry was transferred from the Ministry of Culture to the new Ministry of Radio, Cinema, and Television.

Telecommunications in China - History of telecommunications services

Apart from traditional telegraph and telephone services, China also had facsimile, low-speed data-transmission, and computer-controlled telecommunications services. These included on-line information retrieval terminals in Beijing, Changsha, and Baotou that enabled international telecommunications networks to retrieve news and scientific, technical, economic, and cultural information from international sources.

Telecommunications in China - History of telecommunications services

In April 1984 China launched an experimental communications satellite for trial transmission of broadcasts, telegrams, telephone calls, and facsimile, probably to remote areas of the country. In February 1986 China launched its first fully operational telecommunications and broadcast satellite. The quality and communications capacity of the second satellite reportedly was much greater than the first. In mid-1987 both satellites were still functioning. With these satellites in place China's domestic satellite communication network went into operation, facilitating television and radio transmissions and providing direct-dial longdistance telephone, telegraph, and facsimile service. The network had ground stations in Beijing, Urumqi, Hohhot, Lhasa, and Guangzhou, which also were linked to an Intelsat satellite over the Indian Ocean.

Telecommunications in Thailand - Telecommunications regulatory environment in Thailand

The 2006 amendments repealed all the additional requirements of an applicant of type-two and type-three licenses, stating foreigners can now hold up to 49% in a telecommunications operator of type-two or type-three; no restrictions on the number of their foreign directors’ representation; and the authorized person signing binding commitments as a representation of the applicant firm can be a foreigner.

Telecommunications Regulatory Authority (UAE) - Changes in UAE telecommunications

In January 2010, the Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, in keeping with one of its core missions as manifested in safeguarding consumer rights and monitoring competition within the local telecommunications market, announced telecommunications' "Competition Framework". The "Framework", the first to be developed by TRA, provides a detailed outline benefiting telecommunications consumers by promoting and protecting competition through deterring Licensees from engaging in activities that may impede competition in the UAE telecommunications sector.

Telecommunications in Thailand - Telecommunications regulatory environment in Thailand

National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC)

Telecommunications in Thailand - Telecommunications regulatory environment in Thailand

The NRA Organization Act of 2010 established the new National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) in December 2010 as a single converged regulator for the telecoms and broadcasting sectors in Thailand.

Telecommunications in Thailand - Telecommunications regulatory environment in Thailand

As of December 2018 the National Broadcasting and Telecommunications Commission (NBTC) had issued 58 MVNO licenses, however only 9 had launched.

Telecommunications Regulatory Authority (UAE) - Changes in UAE telecommunications

Since the inception of the TRA, the United Arab Emirates telecommunications infrasture has become more sophisticated. The first footprint was enabling competition in the market by licensing the second telecom operator “Du” besides Etisalat, the first UAE telecom operator. This step resulted enhanced communications services and offered users more options and choices. However in order to increase profits for government licensed telecommunications companies the TRA has taken down several free to use services such as Skype and Discord. The TRA is able to do this anti-consumer practice due to the oligopoly of ISPs (Internet service providers) and the lack of net neutrality in the country.

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