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Royal Signals trades - Supervisory trades

Candidates for YofS and FofS are selected from the Operator and Technician trades for training to first degree and Honours degree respectively. Both are obtained through the Royal School of Signals Blandford whilst being validated by Bournemouth University.

Brisbane Trades Hall - Second trades hall

The building was used by the Queensland trade union movement for meetings, offices, social and educational events, and is the location of the Trades and Labour Council, now known as the Queensland Council of Unions.

Brisbane Trades Hall - First trades hall

The foundation stone of the original trades hall in Turbot Street, Brisbane, was laid on 4 April 1891 by Sir Charles Lilley. There was a procession of unionists from Ann Street, along Queen Street and then up Edward Street to the building site. However, by the 1920s, a larger building was needed as the labour movement had succeeding in unionising about two-thirds of the workforce.

Brisbane Trades Hall - Second trades hall

In 1984 the Trades and Labour Council, as the board of management, sold the property and moved to a new property at Peel Street, South Brisbane. As the original property was granted for the specific purpose of being used as a Trades Hall, the Brisbane Trades Hall Management Act 1984 was required to be passed authorising the transaction, with planning controls on the use of the original historic building.

Brisbane Trades Hall - First trades hall

Following on from the extension of the railway line and tunnel underway from Roma Street in 1889 to Central Station, concern with the weight of the first Trades Hall over the tunnel resulted in land resumption, with a new site selected at Upper Edward Street.

Brisbane Trades Hall - Second trades hall

The foundation stone of the second trades hall was laid on 1 May 1920 by the Queensland Lieutenant-Governor William Lennon. The site was on Turbot Street looking down Edward Street, adjacent to Jacob's Ladder.

Sheffield Trades and Labour Council - Federated Trades Council

Membership of the Trades Council reached 16,000 by 1892, and by this point, a majority of its affiliated membership worked in the heavy trades. Hobson and Uttley were elected to the national Industrial Union of Employers and Employed in 1895, but this organisation soon dissolved.

National Building Trades Council - National Building Trades Council

In 1897, a group of building trades unions from the Midwest met in St. Louis to form a national organization. The new group, the National Building Trades Council, would adjudicate jurisdictional battles through neutral arbitration and encourage the amalgamation of construction and building unions. The NBTC also encouraged the formation of local and regional building trades councils, established a correspondence committee to keep unions informed of jurisdictional decisions and collective bargaining trends, worked to create a national work card system, lobbied for laws requiring an eight-hour day, and lobbied for laws creating mechanics liens.

Sheffield Trades and Labour Council - Federated Trades Council

The Trades Council affiliated to the Labour Representation Committee, but did not agree to the foundation of a local organisation until 1903. In 1904, this became the "Sheffield Trades Council and Labour Representation Committee", an auxiliary of the Trades Council, with the Building Trades Federation, the ILP and the Sheffield Socialist Society also represented. While this Committee dropped "Trades Council" from its name again the following year, its promotion of labour candidates independent from the Liberal Party increasingly brought it into conflict with the Federated Trades Council. The Committee became the Sheffield Trades and Labour Council in June 1908, severing all links with the Federated Trades Council.

Sheffield Trades and Labour Council - Federated Trades Council

The repercussions of the Outrages left the Association moribund, but in October 1872 the trades council reconstituted itself as the Sheffield Federated Trades Council, with William Rolley as Chairman, James Pryor as Secretary and Edward Memmott as Treasurer. The following year, the organisation sent delegates to the national Trades Union Congress, and in 1874 it hosted the event at Sheffield's Temperance Hotel.

Sheffield Trades and Labour Council - Federated Trades Council

In 1885, the leaders of the Trades Council formed the Sheffield Labour Association to campaign for the election of workers to public bodies as members of the Liberal Party. Memmott, Uttley, Charles Hobson and William F. Wardley were all elected to Sheffield Town Council as Lib-Labs. However, Hobson was rejected as a Lib-Lab candidate for the Sheffield Attercliffe by-election, 1894. Although the Executive of the Trades Council drew up an electoral agreement with the Liberal selected, a delegate meeting instead voted to support the Independent Labour Party (ILP) candidate.

National Building Trades Council - National Building Trades Council

But the NBTC was often as ineffective as local councils. Many national and international unions refused to join. The NBTC's respect for local union autonomy often meant that local unions set jurisdictional policy for national unions, a situation national unions could not accept. Local autonomy also meant that jurisdictional decisions in one area held no weight in another, creating a patchwork of different jurisdictional rules nationwide. Membership on the local level was also spotty, hurting local council finances and undercutting the weight of local council decisions. Because the NBTC permitted not only unions belonging to the AFL but also independent union to join, the AFL formally accused the group of dual unionism in 1899 and proceeded to establish building trades councils of its own.

Aberdeen Trades Hospitals - The Trades Hospital in Old Aberdeen

Finally, on 5 May 1792, this entry is recorded: ''“... in a full meeting of the Trads of Old Aberdeen it was represented to the Trades that there was a proposall to the trads for celling the house belonging to them comenly called the Hospitle and being delibrated upon they came to the following resoulation that they would cell it for fifty pound sterling and impowrs the Convneer and Box Master to make the best bargain they cane with a desctirany power for the same....”''

National Building Trades Council - National Building Trades Council

The ineffectiveness of the National Building Trades Council and pressure on member unions from the AFL led Frank Duffy, president of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, to form the Structural Building Trades Alliance (SBTA) in 1903. With most of its members participating in the SBTA, NBTC struggled to remain relevant. It became moribund in 1907, and disbanded in 1921.

Aberdeen Trades Hospitals - The Trades Hospital in Old Aberdeen

At the beginning of the eighteenth century, an important development took place in Old Aberdeen. It should be remembered, that although the burgh of Old Aberdeen is now part of the City of Aberdeen, in the eighteenth century, the two burghs had separate civic authorities, along with trades and merchant organizations. From records of the Incorporated Trades in Old Aberdeen, in 1708, an initiative to seek support for a Hospital for elderly members was started. It was a cautious beginning with a book for subscriptions being opened. The Records of the Trades Council concerning the Hospital are recorded in the Records of Old Aberdeen. which provides the following narrative.

Aberdeen Trades Hospitals - The Trades Hospital in Old Aberdeen

There does not appears to be a full explanation of why the hospital was closed. It is unlikely that there was no longer a need. It is more likely that the relationship between the individual Trades associations broke down with regard to the placement of elderly relicks. Perhaps the strict regime placed on the residents became intolerable. Perhaps, there were more possibilities for dependents to live with extended families in the community. For whatever reason a solution to the problem of supporting "relicks" and other family members of Incorporated Trades members was to emerge from outwith the Incorporated Trades. It came from a rather unlikely source, a graduate from Marischal College in Aberdeen. This was David Mitchell who had been born in Old Aberdeen but lived for some forty years in Holloway Down, then in Essex.

Aberdeen Trades Hospitals - The Trades Hospital in Old Aberdeen

By 28 April 1711, progress had been made and a plan for the hospital had been drawn up and the relative contributions from the then five trades in Old Aberdeen appear to be secure.

Aberdeen Trades Hospitals - The Trades Hospital in Old Aberdeen

The story continues in an account of Old Aberdeen written by the Town Clerk, William Orem in 1725. Orem records: ''“…. the said trades have built in the close of the aforesaid manse (Endowed by the Parson of Turriff) .. an hospital for ten poor widows, tradesmen's relicts, anno 1711. This hospital was built by contributions, and the poor women living it have not much allowance. There are an handed merks mortified to them by the deceast Alexander Mitchell, late clerk to the trades of New Aberdeen. The trades of Old Aberdeen give them some money quarterly; and they get charity from several persons of said town. There are now in it eight women, anno 1725, who get each of them quarterly twenty millings Scots from said trades, who likewise have appointed little hail-yards for them within said close. To the trades belongs the big house, which pays yearly twenty-eight pounds Scots money; and the yard and house on the street pay ??? merks….”''

Aberdeen Trades Hospitals - The Trades Hospital in Old Aberdeen

It appears that continued funding of the hospital presented a major problem. The Records of Old Aberdeen are selective in recording the development of the hospital. Only two further entries suggest that while the hospital had been open in 1712 within fifty years disputes had broke out within the Trades and that finally, in 1792, a decision was made to sell the building.

Aberdeen Trades Hospitals - The Trades Hospital in Old Aberdeen

By November of that year discussions started with regard to the allocation of rooms for the residents. The allocation was to be in relation to the contribution and influence each of the individual Trades exercised. In 1712, when the building was complete, the Convener Court were able to ask the Principal of King’s College, Dr. George Middleton (1684-1717), to be the Patron of the Hospital.; On 24 May 1712, the Trades Council visited the building which had been completed to carry out the negotiations between the different Trades as to who was given which room for their relicks. Attendance on the day appears to have been important as the Fleshers were allocated a room by default as they had not been in attendance!

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