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World's Funniest

World's Funniest, formerly World's Funniest Fails, is an American reality television series produced by Dick Clark Productions and Jukin Media which made its debut on Fox on January 16, 2015. Hosted by Terry Crews, the funny videos show was inspired by YouTube channel FailArmy. A panel of comedians views and analyzes the videos, which are divided into categories. In the first season each panel member selected a favorite in each category. Crews chooses a video in each category and decides on the "Fail of the Week" at the end. The panel member who picked the "Fail of the Week" receives the trophy. The show states in a disclaimer that viewer submissions are not accepted; unlike America's Funniest Home Videos, this show makes no claim as to whether people in the videos were hurt by their reckless behavior.

World's fair - World Expos

Frederick Pittera, a producer of international exhibitions and author of the history of world's fairs in the Encyclopædia Britannica and Compton Encyclopedia, was commissioned by Mayor Robert F. Wagner Jr. of New York City in 1959 to prepare the first feasibility studies for the 1964 New York World's Fair. Pittera was joined in his study by Austrian architect Victor Gruen (Inventor of the 'Shopping Mall'). The Eisenhower Commission ultimately awarded the world's fair bid to New York City against several major U.S. cities.

World's Finest - Other uses

* World's Finest Chocolate, an American chocolatier

World's Finest

World's Finest may refer to:

World's fair - World Expos

The only Registered (Universal) exposition to be held without BIE approval was the 1964–1965 New York World's Fair. The sanctioning organization at Paris denied them "official" status because its president, Robert Moses, did not comply with BIE rules in place at the time, namely the one limiting the duration for universal expositions to six months only. The two World's Fairs in New York (1939–40 and 1964–65) and the Century of Progress in Chicago (1934-1935) have the distinction of being the only two-year world expositions in history. The Fair proceeded without BIE approval and turned to tourism and trade organizations to host national pavilions in lieu of official government sponsorship. However, a large number of countries did participate in the world's fair including several newly independent African and Asian states.

World's Funniest

The show has no direct connection to another past Fox show of the near-same title, The World's Funniest!, which aired on the network from 1998 until 2000 and was produced by Brad Lachman Productions.

World's fair

A world's fair or world fair is a large international exhibition designed to showcase achievements of nations. These exhibitions vary in character and are held in different parts of the world at a specific site for a period of time, ranging usually from three to six months.

World's fair - Non-BIE Efforts

Due to the U.S. government's withdrawing its membership in the Bureau International des Expositions from 2002 to 2017, Worlds Fair Nano is the first private effort in history to host a six-month World's Fair. Worlds Fair Nano is organizing a series of mini-World's Fairs around the country called World's Fair Nano in cities like San Francisco and New York City in order to build excitement for the six month World's Fair, which Worlds Fair Nano hopes to organize within the decade.

World's fair - Non-BIE Efforts

The Los Angeles World's Fair is another non-BIE effort.

World's fair - Cultural exchange (1939–1987)

The 1967 International and Universal Exposition in Montreal was promoted under the name Expo 67. Event organizers retired the term world's fair in favor of Expo. (The Montreal Expos, a former Major League Baseball team, was named for the 1967 fair.)

World's End

World's End or Worlds End may refer to:

World's fair - Non-BIE Efforts

Walt Disney World in Florida is hosting a perpetual world's fair at its EPCOT exhibit, called World Showcase.

World's fair - Legacy

Many exhibitions and rides created by Walt Disney and his WED Enterprises company for the 1964 New York World's Fair (which was held over into 1965) were moved to Disneyland after the closing of the Fair. Many of the rides, including "it's a small world", and "Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln", as well as the building that housed the Carousel of Progress are still in operation.

World's Funniest - Reception

Brain Lowry of Variety said World's Funniest Fails "tries to concoct a game element around the clips that never really makes sense", but "if the goal was to develop a series that exhibits even a shred of originality or ingenuity, as 'Fails of the Week' go, hey, it looks like we already have a winner!"

World's fair - Cultural exchange (1939–1987)

The 1939–40 New York World's Fair, and those that followed, took a different approach, one less focused on technology and aimed more at cultural themes and social progress. For instance, the theme of the 1939 fair was "Building the World of Tomorrow"; at the 1964–65 New York World's Fair, it was "Peace Through Understanding"; at the 1967 International and Universal Exposition in Montreal, it was "Man and His World". These fairs encouraged effective intercultural communication along with sharing of technological innovation.

World's fair - Legacy

Disney had contributed so many exhibits to the New York fair in part because the corporation had originally envisioned a "permanent World's Fair" at the Flushing site. That concept instead came to fruition with the Disney theme park Epcot, an extension of the Walt Disney World Resort, near Orlando, Florida. Epcot has many of the characteristics of a typical universal exposition: national pavilions, as well as exhibits concerning technology and/or the future, along with more typical amusement park rides. Meanwhile, several of the 1964 attractions, relocated to Disneyland, have been duplicated at the Walt Disney World Resort.

Full Cycle: A World Odyssey - World's Firsts

The couple obtained over 75 hours of new stock footage, featuring "world's firsts": first Westerners to travel (and bicycle) through the Himalayas of North Sikkim, India; first to ride a mountain bike 60 feet under the Pacific Ocean, and in a semi-active volcano in Costa Rica; first to document nine-times world's champion bicycle trials rider Ot Pi, performing stunts near and around historical landmarks in Athens, Greece.

Lorena Hickok - World's Fair

On the advice of Roosevelt's secretary, Malvina Thompson, Hickok then sought work in New York with public relations man and politician Grover Whalen. Shortly after Franklin Roosevelt's 1936 re-election, Hickok was hired by Whalen to do publicity for the 1939 New York World's Fair. Opportunities for female employees of the Fair were limited, and she found the work unrewarding compared to her reporting days. Hickok primarily worked on promoting the fair to young people, including arranging class trips. Because Hickok rented both a country home and an apartment, she often faced financial problems despite her good salary during these years, and Roosevelt occasionally sent her small gifts of money.

Ferdinand Lee Barnett (Chicago) - World's Fair

In 1893, Barnett coauthored a pamphlet entitled "The Reason Why the Colored American is not in the World's Columbian Exposition – The Afro-American's Contribution to Columbian Literature". The exposition, held in Chicago, refused to include an African American exhibit. The pamphlet was another early example of Barnett's personal and professional relationship with Wells. The pamphlet was published by Barnett, Wells, abolitionist Frederick Douglass, and educator Irvine Garland Penn. The exhibition included a number of exhibits put on by individuals and approved by white organizers of the fair, including exhibits by the sculptor Edmonia Lewis, a painting exhibit by scientist George Washington Carver, and a statistical exhibit by John Imogen Howard. It also included blacks in white exhibits, such as Nancy Green's portrayal of the character, "Aunt Jemima" for the R. T. Davis Milling Company.

Windy City (nickname) - World's Fair

'Don't pay any attention', wrote Charles A. Dana, day in and day out in his New York Sun, 'to the nonsensical claims of that windy city. Its people could not build a World's Fair even if they won it.'

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